Etymology
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half-hearted (adj.)

also halfhearted, "showing little enthusiasm," early 15c.; see half + -hearted. Related: halfheartedly; halfheartedness. English in 17c. had also half-headed "stupid."

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half seas over (adj.)
slang for "drunk," 1736, sometimes said to be from notion of a ship heavy-laden and so low in the water that small waves (half seas) wash over the deck. This suits the sense, but the phrase is not recorded in this alleged literal sense. Half seas over "halfway across the sea" is recorded from 1550s, however, and it was given a figurative extension to "halfway through a matter" by 1690s. What drunkenness is halfway to is not clear.
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faith-healer (n.)

Also faith healer, attested by 1874; from faith + healer. Faith-curer is from 1883.

The power which a man's imagination has over his body to heal it or make it sick is a force which none of us is born without. The first man had it, the last one will possess it. If left to himself, a man is most likely to use only the mischievous half of the force—the half which invents imaginary ailments for him and cultivates them; and if he is one of those very wise people, he is quite likely to scoff at the beneficent half of the force and deny its existence. ["Mark Twain," "Christian Science," 1907]
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semi- 

word-forming element of Latin origin meaning "half," also loosely, "part, partly; partial, almost; imperfect; twice," from Latin semi- "half" (before vowels often sem-, sometimes further reduced to se- before m-), from PIE *semi- "half" (source also of Sanskrit sami "half," Greek hēmi- "half," Old English sam-, Gothic sami- "half").

The Old English cognate, sam-, was used in such compounds as samhal "in poor health, weakly," literally "half-whole;" samsoden "half-cooked" ('half-sodden'), figuratively "stupid" (compare half-baked); samcucu "half-dead," etymologically "half-alive" (see quick (adj.)); and the lingering survivor, sandblind "dim-sighted" (q.v.).

The Latin element was common in formations from Late Latin, as in semi-gravis "half-drunk," semi-hora "half hour," semi-mortuus "half-dead," semi-nudus "half-naked," semi-vir "half-man, hermaphrodite."

The Latin-derived form in English has been active in forming native words since 15c. Semi-bousi "half-drunk" ('semi-boozy'), now obsolete, was among the earliest (c. 1400). As a noun, semi has variously been short for semi-detached house (by 1912), semi-trailer (by 1942), semi-final (by 1942).

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sesqui- 

word-forming element meaning usually "one half more" than the indicated unit, from Latin sesqui-, sesque- "one and a half; one-half more," contraction of *semis-que- "a half in addition," from *semis "a half" (see semi-) + -que "and" (from PIE root *kwe "and, -ever," for which see ubiquity). Latin semi- had a tendency to get partly swallowed in compounds; compare these derivatives listed in de Vaan: selibra "half a libra," semodius "half a modius," sestertius "having the value of two-and-a-half" (as a noun, the name of a silver Roman coin, short for sestertius nummus), contracted from *semistertius; simbella "coin worth half a libella;" sincipitis "a half-head."

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demi- 

word-forming element meaning "half, half-sized, partial," used in English from mid-14c., especially in technical terms from French, from Old French demi "half" (12c.), from Late Latin dimedius, from Latin dimidius "half, one-half," which contains the elements dis- "apart" (see dis-) + medius "in the middle, between; from the middle," as a noun "the middle;" from PIE root *medhyo- "middle." Formerly also demy-, and in early use often written as a separate word.

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hemistich (n.)

"half a poetic line," 1570s, from French hémistiche (16c.) or directly from Late Latin hemistichium, from Greek hēmistikhion "half-line, half-verse," from hēmi- "half" (see hemi-) + stikhos "row, line of verse," from PIE *stigho-, suffixed form of root *steigh- "to stride, step, rise" (see stair). Related: Hemistichal.

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sesquipedalian (n.)

1610s, "person or thing a foot and a half long," from Latin sesquipedalia "a foot-and-a-half long," from sesqui- "half as much again" (see sesqui-) + stem of pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

As an adjective in English from 1650s, in reference to words, containing or measuring a foot and a half. The meaning "sesquipedalian word" (1830) is from Latin sesquipedalia verba "words a foot-and-a-half long," in Horace's "Ars Poetica," nicely illustrating the thing he describes. Related: Sesquipedalianism.

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moiety (n.)

"an equal half, a half part or share," mid-15c., moite, from Old French moite, earlier meitiet (12c., Modern French moitié) "half; middle; portion, piece," from Latin medietatem (nominative medietas) "half," originally "middle point," from medius "middle" (from PIE root *medhyo- "middle").

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semi-annual (adj.)

also semiannual, "half-yearly, recurring every half year," 1775, from semi- + annual (adj.). Compare French semi-annuel. Related: Semiannually.

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