Etymology
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landowner (n.)
also land-owner, 1733, from land (n.) + owner.
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strip (n.)
"long, narrow, flat piece," mid-15c., "narrow piece of cloth," probably related to or from Middle Low German strippe "strap, thong," and from the same source as stripe (n.1). Sense extension to wood, land, etc. first recorded 1630s.

Sense in comic strip is from 1920. Airport sense is from 1936; race track sense from 1941. Meaning "street noted for clubs, bars, etc." is attested from 1939, originally in reference to Los Angeles' Sunset Strip. Strip mine (n.) attested by 1892, as a verb by 1916; so called because the surface material is removed in successive parallel strips.
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landed (adj.)
"possessed of land," late Old English gelandod; see land (n.).
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moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

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vaterland (n.)
1852, from German Vaterland, from Vater (see father (n.)) + Land (see land (n.)).
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dreamland (n.)

"land or region seen in dreams," hence "the land of fancy or imagination," 1827, from dream (n.) + land (n.).

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lowland (n.)
land lower than other land thereabouts, c. 1500, originally with reference to the southern and eastern regions of Scotland, from low (adj.) + land (n.). As an adjective from 1560s. Related: Lowlander.
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guess (n.)
c. 1300, "indiscriminate conclusion, guesswork, doubtful supposition," from guess (v.). Mid-15c. as "considered opinion." Verbal shrug phrase your guess is as good as mine attested from 1902.
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fairyland (n.)
also fairy-land, 1580s, from fairy + land (n.). Earlier simply Faerie (c. 1300).
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shadowland (n.)
also shadow-land, 1821, "abode of ghosts and spirits," from shadow (n.) + land (n.). From 1923 as "indeterminate place."
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