Etymology
Advertisement
woodland (n.)

Old English wudulond; see wood (n.) + land (n.). As an adjective from mid-14c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
landlord (n.)

early 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), "owner of a tenement, one who rents land or property to a tenant," from land (n.) + lord (n.).

Related entries & more 
parkland (n.)

1907, "grassland with scattered trees;" by 1937 as "land used for a park," from park (n.) + land (n.).

Related entries & more 
gangland (n.)

"the criminal underworld; the realm of gangsters," 1912, from gang (n.) + land (n.).

Related entries & more 
fairyland (n.)

also fairy-land, 1580s, from fairy + land (n.). Earlier simply Faerie (c. 1300).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overland (adv.)

"over or across the country," 1580s, from over- + land (n.). As an adjective, "made, done, or lying upon or across the land," by 1800.

Related entries & more 
vaterland (n.)

1852, from German Vaterland, from Vater (see father (n.)) + Land (see land (n.)).

Related entries & more 
dreamland (n.)

"land or region seen in dreams," hence "the land of fancy or imagination," 1827, from dream (n.) + land (n.).

Related entries & more 
Ireland 

12c. in Anglo-Norman, a Germanic-Celtic hybrid, with land (n.) + Celtic Eriu (see Irish (n.)).

Related entries & more 
landlubber (n.)

also land-lubber, "A useless long-shorer; a vagrant stroller. Applied by sailors to the mass of landsmen, especially those without employment" [W.H. Smyth, "The Sailor's Word-book"], c. 1700, from land (n.) + lubber (q.v.).

Related entries & more 

Page 4