Etymology
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Caracas 

Venezuelan capital, founded 1567 by the Spaniards on the site of a razed village of the Caracas people, whose name is of unknown origin, and named for them.

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Chalcedon 

city in Bithynia, opposite Constantinople, site of an important Church council (451),  from Phoenician, literally "new town." 

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stock market (n.)

"place where securities are bought and sold," 1809, from stock (n.2) + market. The original Stock Market (mid-14c.) was a fish and meat market in the City of London on or near the later site of Mansion House, so called perhaps because it occupied the site of a former stocks. Stock exchange is attested from 1773.

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landlocked (adj.)

also land-locked, "almost shut in by land," 1620s, from land (n.) + past participle of lock (v.).

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landfall (n.)

"sighting of land," 1620s, also "the first land 'made' on a sea voyage" (1883); from land (n.) + fall (v.) in the sense of "happen." A word from the days of imprecise nautical navigation.

Land-fall. The first land discovered after a sea voyage. Thus a good land fall implies the land expected or desired; a bad landfall the reverse. [John Hamilton Moore, "The New Practical Navigator," London, 1814]

Of hurricanes, by 1932.

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landowner (n.)

also land-owner, 1733, from land (n.) + owner.

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prefabricate (v.)

"manufacture in a factory prior to assembly on site," 1919 (implied in prefabricated), from pre- + fabricate (v.). Related: Prefabricating.

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landed (adj.)

"possessed of land," late Old English gelandod; see land (n.).

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moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

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vaterland (n.)

1852, from German Vaterland, from Vater (see father (n.)) + Land (see land (n.)).

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