Etymology
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kinetic (adj.)

"relating to muscular motion," 1841, from Greek kinetikos "moving, putting in motion," from kinetos "moved," verbal adjective of kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion").

Buster Keaton's subject was kinetic man, a being he approached with the almost metaphysical awe we reserve for a Doppelgänger. This being was, eerily, himself, played by himself, then later in a projection room, watched by himself: an experience never possible to any generation of actors in the previous history of the world. [Hugh Kenner, "The Counterfeiters," 1968]

From 1855 as "causing motion." Related: Kinetical; kinetically.

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kinky (adj.)
1844, "full of kinks, twisted, curly," from kink (n.) + -y (2). Meaning "odd, eccentric, crotchety" is from 1859; that of "sexually perverted" is from 1959. Related: Kinkiness.
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kind-hearted (adj.)
also kindhearted, 1530s; see kind (adj.) + -hearted. Related: Kindheartedly, kindheartedness.
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kindness (n.)
c. 1300, "courtesy, noble deeds," from kind (adj.) + -ness. Meanings "kind deeds; kind feelings; quality or habit of being kind" are from late 14c. Old English kyndnes meant "nation," also "produce, an increase."
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kindly (adj.)
c. 1200, cundelich, "natural, right, lawful," from Old English gecyndelic "natural, innate; in accordance with the laws or processes of nature, suitable, lawful" (of birth, etc.); see kind (adj.) + -ly (1). From late 14c. as "pleasant, agreeable;" from 1560s as "full of loving courtesy." Related: Kindliness. The Old English word also meant "pertaining to generation," hence cyndlim "womb," in plural "genitalia," literally "kind-limb."
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kingship (n.)
early 14c., from king (n.) + -ship. Old English had cynescipe.
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kingpin (n.)
also king-pin, 1801 as the name of the large pin in the game of kayles (similar to bowls except a club or stick was thrown instead of a ball; see "Games, Gaming and Gamesters' Laws," Frederick Brandt, London, 1871), from king with a sense of "chief" + pin (n.).

The modern use is mainly figurative and is perhaps from the word's use as synonym for king-bolt (itself from 1825), a large, thick, heavy bolt used in a machinery to couple large parts, but if this is the origin, the figurative use is attested earlier (1867) than the literal (1914).
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kinesiology (n.)

1894, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ology. Related: Kinesiological; kinesiologically.

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kindling (n.)
"material for lighting fire," usually dry wood in small pieces, 1510s, verbal noun from kindle (v.). Earlier "a setting alight" (c. 1300).
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