Etymology
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sorosis (n.)

"consolidated fleshy multiple fruit" (such as a pineapple), 1831, from Modern Latin, from Greek sōros "a heap" (of corn), which is of uncertain origin.

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pile (v.)

"to heap (up), lay or throw in a heap," c. 1400, from pile (n.1). Related: Piled; piling. Figurative verbal phrase pile on "attack vigorously, attack en masse," is attested by 1894, American English. To pile in "climb or go on or into in a crowd" is by 1841; hence, for the reverse process, pile out, by 1896.

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peloton (n.)

1706, "small body of soldiers, platoon," from French peloton, derivative of pelote "ball, heap, platoon" (11c.); see platoon (n.).

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cairn (n.)
"large, conical heap of stone," especially of the type common in Scotland and Wales and also found elsewhere in Britain, 1530s, from Scottish carne, akin to Gaelic carn "heap of stones, rocky hill" and Gaulish karnon "horn," perhaps from PIE *ker-n- "highest part of the body, horn," thus "tip, peak" (see horn (n.)).
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stack (n.)
c. 1300, "pile, heap, or group of things," from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse stakkr "haystack" (cognate with Danish stak, Swedish stack "heap, stack"), from Proto-Germanic *stakon- "a stake," from PIE *stog- (source also of Old Church Slavonic stogu "heap," Russian stog "haystack," Lithuanian stokas "pillar"), variant of root *steg- (1) "pole, stick" (see stake (n.)). Meaning "set of shelves on which books are set out" is from 1879. Used of the chimneys of factories, locomotives, etc., since 1825. Of computer data from 1960.
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psephomancy (n.)

"divination by means of pebbles drawn from a heap," 1727, from Greek psēphos "pebble" (a word of uncertain origin) + -mancy "divination by means of."

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mow (n.)

"stack of hay," Old English muga, muwa "a heap (of grain, pease, etc.), swath of corn; crowd of people," earlier muha, from Proto-Germanic *mugon (source also of Old Norse mugr "a heap," mostr "crowd"), of uncertain origin. Meaning "place in a barn where hay or sheaves of grain are stored" is by 1755.

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huddle (v.)
1570s, "to heap or crowd together," probably from Low German hudern "to cover, to shelter" (of hens on chicks or nurses with children), from Middle Low German huden "to cover up," which is probably a frequentative form from Proto-Germanic *hud-, from PIE *keudh-, extended form of root *(s)keu- "to cover, conceal." Compare also Middle English hoderen "heap together, huddle" (c. 1300). Related: Huddled; huddling. The noun is from 1580s. U.S. football sense is from 1928.
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structure (n.)
mid-15c., "action or process of building or construction;" 1610s, "that which is constructed, a building or edifice;" from Latin structura "a fitting together, adjustment; a building, mode of building;" figuratively, "arrangement, order," from structus, past participle of struere "to pile, place together, heap up; build, assemble, arrange, make by joining together," related to strues "heap," from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread."
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tell (n.)
"mound, hill," 1864, from Arabic tall, related to Hebrew tel "mount, hill, heap." Compare Hebrew talul "lofty," Akkadian tillu "woman's breast."
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