Etymology
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jubilate (v.)
"make a joyful noise," 1640s, from Latin iubilatus, past participle of iubilare "shout for joy" (see jubilant). Related: Jubilated; jubilating.
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listless (adj.)
"languid and unresponsive, slothful," mid-15c., from Middle English liste "pleasure, joy, delight" (see list (v.4)) + -less. Spenser, if no one else, tried listful (1590s). Related: Listlessly; listlessness.
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yodel (v.)
"sing by sudden changing to and from falsetto," 1827, from German jodeln, from dialectal German jo, an exclamation of joy, of imitative origin. As a noun from 1849.
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Hathor 
cow-goddess of love and joy in ancient Egypt, identified by the Greeks with their Aphrodite, from Greek Hathor, from Egyptian Het-Heru "mansion of Horus," or possibly Het-Herh "the house above."
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jouissance (n.)
late 15c., "possession and use" (of something), from Old French joissance, from joissant "happy, glad," present participle of joir "to enjoy, take delight in, take pleasure in" (see enjoy). Meaning "enjoyment, joy, mirth" is from 1570s.
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pooh-pooh (v.)

"to dismiss lightly and contemptuously," literally "to turn aside with an exclamation of 'pooh,'" 1827, a slang reduplication of dismissive expression pooh. Among the many 19th century theories of the origin of language was the Pooh-pooh theory (1860), which held that language grew from natural expressions of surprise, joy, pain, or grief.

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Edwin 
masc. proper name, from Old English Ead-wine, literally "prosperity-friend, friend of riches," from ead "wealth, prosperity, joy" (see Edith) + wine "friend, protector" (related to winnan "to strive, struggle, fight;" see win (v.)).
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exuberance (n.)
1630s, "an overflowing," from French exubérance (16c.), from Late Latin exuberantia "superabundance," abstract noun from exuberare "be abundant, grow luxuriously" (see exuberant). Usually figurative in English, especially of joy, happiness, etc. Exuberancy attested from 1610s.
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glad (adj.)
Old English glæd "bright, shining, gleaming; joyous; pleasant, gracious" (also as a noun, "joy, gladness"), from Proto-Germanic *gladaz (source also of Old Norse glaðr "smooth, bright, glad," Danish glad "glad, joyful," Old Saxon gladmod, in which the element means "glad," Old Frisian gled "smooth," Dutch glad "slippery," German glatt "smooth"), from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine." Apparently the notion is of being radiant with joy; the modern sense "feeling pleasure or satisfaction" is much weakened. Slang glad rags "one's best clothes" first recorded 1902.
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*kweie- 
*kweiə-, also *kwyeə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rest, be quiet."

It forms all or part of: acquiesce; acquit; awhile; coy; quiesce; quiescent; quiet; quietism; quietude; quietus; quit; quitclaim; quite; quit-rent; quittance; requiescat; requiem; requite; while; whilom.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Avestan shaitish "joy," shaiti- "well-being," shyata- "happy;" Old Persian šiyatish "joy;" Latin quies "rest, repose, quiet;" Old Church Slavonic po-koji "rest;" Old Norse hvild "rest."
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