Etymology
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truck (v.2)

"to convey on a truck," 1809, from truck (n.). Verbal meaning "dance, move in a cool way," first attested 1935, from popular dance of that name in U.S., supposedly introduced at Cotton Club, 1933. Related: Trucked; trucking.

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talipes (n.)

"club-foot, deformed foot," from Latin talus "ankle" (see talus (n.1)) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). The notion seems to be "walking on the ankles."

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ladies (n.)

plural of lady (q.v.). Ladies' night (1880) originally was any event to which women were invited at an all-male club.

Every succeeding occasion is usually said to be "the best ever," but for true pleasure, comfort and genuine enjoyment it is doubtful if any occasion has been more truly "the best ever" than the ladies' night of the Paint, Oil and Varnish Club of Chicago, which was given in the Crystal ballroom of the Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, Thursday evening January 26. ["Paint, Oil and Drug Review," Feb. 1, 1911]
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blackball (v.)

also black-ball, "to exclude from a club by adverse votes," 1770, from black (adj.) + ball (n.1). The image is of the black balls of wood or ivory that were dropped into an urn as adverse votes during secret ballots. Related: Blackballed; blackballing.

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divot (n.)

"piece of turf or sod with the grass growing on it," used for roofing material, etc., 1530s, Scottish,  of unknown origin. Also divet, diffat, devot, etc. The golfing sense "slice of turf cut out by the club in playing a stroke" is by 1884.

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claviger (n.)

"one who carries a key of a room," c. 1600, from Latin claviger, from clavis "key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook") + stem of gerere "to bear" (see gest). Latin claviger also was an epithet of Hercules, from clava "club, knotty branch," which is related to clavis.

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mace (n.1)

"heavy one-handed metal weapon, often with a spiked head, for striking," c. 1300, from Old French mace "a club, scepter" (Modern French massue), from Vulgar Latin *mattea (source also of Italian mazza, Spanish maza "mace"), from Latin mateola (in Late Latin also matteola) "a kind of mallet." The Latin word perhaps is cognate with Sanskrit matyam "harrow, club, roller," Old Church Slavonic motyka, Russian motyga "hoe," Old High German medela "plow" [de Vaan, Klein].

As a ceremonial symbol of authority or office, a scepter or staff having somewhat the form of a mace of war, it is attested from mid-14c. Related: Mace-bearer.

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kayles (n.)

old game similar to bowls except a club or stick was thrown instead of a ball, from kail, from Middle English kayle "a pin, ninepin, skittlepin;" cognate with German Kegel, Danish kegle. Also the name of a game with nine holes drilled in the ground (an iron ball is rolled among them).

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Hells Angels (n.)

motorcycle club, the name first attested 1957. They were called Black Rebels in the 1954 film "The Wild One." Earlier Hell's Angels had been used as the title of a film about World War I air combat (1930).

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diner (n.)

1815, "one who dines," agent noun from dine. Meaning "railway car for eating" is 1890, American English; of restaurants built to resemble dining cars (or in some cases actual converted dining cars) from 1935. The Diner's Club credit card system dates from 1952.

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