Etymology
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bean-stalk (n.)
also beanstalk, "stem of a bean plant," 1800 (in the story of Jack and the giant), from bean (n.) + stalk (n.).
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telecommuting (n.)
by 1975, as a hypothetical workplace set-up; verbal noun from telecommute. Said to have been coined by Jack Niles of USC.
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will-o'-the-wisp (n.)

1660s, earlier Will with the wisp (c. 1600), from the masc. proper name Will + wisp "bundle of hay or straw used as a torch." Compare Jack-o'-lantern.

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jumping (adj.)
1560s, present-participle adjective from jump (v.). Jumping-bean is from 1878 (earlier jumping-seed, 1870, also devil-bean, 1878). Jumping-jack is from 1821 as a kind of child's stringed toy; as a type of fitness exercise that somewhat mimics its motions, it is from 1921.
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artful (adj.)
1610s, "learned, well-versed in the (liberal) arts," also "characterized by technical skill, artistic," from art (n.) + -ful. Meaning "cunning, crafty, skilled in adapting means to ends" is from 1739. Related: Artfully; artfulness. The Artful Dodger (Jack Dawkins) is from Dickens' "Oliver Twist" (1837-39).
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davit (n.)

also david, "crane-like structure on the side or stern of a vessel for suspending or lowering a boat," late 14c., daviot, apparently a use of the masc. proper name David on the pattern of applying common Christian names to useful devices (compare jack, jenny, jimmy).

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merry-andrew (n.)

"a buffoon; a zany; a jack-pudding" [Johnson], "One whose business it is to make sport for others by jokes and ridiculous posturing" [Century Dictionary], according to OED, in early use properly a mountebank's assistant, 1670s, from merry + masc. proper name Andrew, but there is no certain identification with an individual, and the name here may be generic.

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palooka (n.)

by 1926, "mediocre prizefighter," of unknown origin, credited to U.S. sportswriter and Variety magazine staffer Jack "Con" Conway (1898-1928), who might at least have popularized it. Non-boxing sense of "average person" is from Joe Palooka, hero of Ham Fisher's boxing-themed comic strip, which debuted in 1930.

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scram (v.)

"depart quickly," often as an interjection, 1928, U.S. slang, either a shortened form of scramble (v.) or from German schramm, imperative singular of schrammen "depart," which is of uncertain origin. Said to be another coinage of U.S. sportswriter and Variety magazine staffer Jack "Con" Conway (1898-1928). Related: Scrammed; scramming.

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tar (n.2)

also Jack Tar, "sailor," 1670s, probably a special use of tar (n.1), which stuff was a staple for waterproofing aboard old ships (knights of the tarbrush being a jocular phrase for "sailors"); or possibly a shortened form of tarpaulin, which was recorded as a nickname for a sailor in 1640s, from the tarpaulin garments they wore.

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