Etymology
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concretize (v.)

"to render (the abstract) concrete," 1826, from concrete (adj.) + -ize. Concrete itself sometimes was used as a verb in various senses from 1630s. Related: Concretized; concretizing.

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insula (n.)
Latin, literally "an island" (also, in ancient Rome, "a block of buildings"); see isle. In anatomical use, the notion is "detached or standing out by itself."
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life-boat (n.)
"boat built for saving lives at sea," especially in a shipwreck, also lifeboat, 1801 (the thing itself attested by 1785), from life (n.) + boat.
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catalyst (n.)

"substance which speeds a chemical reaction but itself remains unchanged," 1900, formed in English (on analogy of analyst) from catalysis. Figurative use by 1943.

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dork (n.)

"stupid person," 1967, originally U.S. student slang, perhaps from earlier meaning "penis" (1964), itself probably an alteration of dick (n.). Related: Dorky; dorkiness.

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safety-pin (n.)

a pin bent back on itself so as to form a spring and having a little sheath to fit over the point, 1857, from safety (adj.) + pin (n.).

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pokey (n.)

"jail," by 1919, American English slang, also poky, pogey, of uncertain origin; Barnhart says perhaps altered from pogie "poorhouse" (1891), which itself is of unknown origin.

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tarnation (n.)
1784, American English alteration of darnation (itself a euphemism for damnation), influenced by tarnal (1790), a mild profanity, clipped from phrase by the Eternal (God) (see eternal).
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poult (n.)

"the young of a chicken or domestic fowl," mid-15c. (early 14c. in surnames), a contraction of Middle English pulte, itself a contraction of polete "young chicken" (see pullet).

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corm (n.)

also corme, 1570s, "fruit of the service-tree," from French corme, from Latin cornum "cornel-cherry" (but applied to service-berries in French); see cornel. Of the tree itself, 1670s.

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