Etymology
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Micronesia 

collective name for the islands and island groups in the western Pacific north of the equator, 1840, from Italian, literally "the region of small islands," Modern Latin, formed on model of Polynesia from micro- "small" (see micro-) + Greek nēsos "island" (see Chersonese). Related: Micronesian.

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Alcatraz 
prison-island in San Francisco Bay; see albatross.
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Sumatra 
said to be from Sanskrit Samudradvipa "ocean-island." Related: Sumatran.
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Shikoku 
Japanese island, literally "four provinces," from shi "four" + koku "province."
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Okinawa 
largest of the Ryuku island chain, Japanese, literally "rope on the sea." Related: Okinawan.
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Komodo dragon (n.)
1927, named for Indonesian island of Komodo, where it lives.
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isle (n.)

late 13c., ile, from Old French ile, earlier isle, from Latin insula "island," a word of uncertain origin.

Perhaps (as the Ancients guessed) from in salo "(that which is) in the (salty) sea," from ablative of salum "the open sea," related to sal "salt" (see salt (n.)). De Vaan finds this "theoretically possible as far as the phonetics go, but being 'in the sea' is not a very precise description of what an island is; furthermore, the Indo-Europeans seem to have indicated with 'island' mainly 'river islands.' ... Since no other etymology is obvious, it may well be a loanword from an unknown language." He proposes the same lost word as the source of Old Irish inis, Welsh ynys "island" and Greek nēsos "island." The -s- was restored first in French, then in English in the late 1500s.

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Madeira 

group of volcanic islands off the northwest coast of Africa, from Portuguese madeira "wood," because the main island formerly was thickly wooded, from Latin materia "wood, matter" (see matter (n.)). As a type of fine wine of the sherry class, 1540s, from the island, where it was produced.

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Britain (n.)
proper name of the island containing England, Scotland, and Wales, c. 1300, Breteyne, from Old French Bretaigne, from Latin Britannia, earlier Brittania, from Brittani "the Britons" (see Briton). The Old English place-name Brytenlond meant "Wales." If there was a Celtic name for the island, it has not been recorded.
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Haiti 
from Arawak haiti "land of mountains," and probably originally the name of the whole island. Related: Haitian.
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