Etymology
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cross-examine (n.)

"examine a witness (by the other side) to 'check' the effects of previous questioning," 1660s, from cross (adv.) in the sense "proceeding from an adverse party by way of reciprocal contest" + examine. Related: Cross-examination (1746).

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cross-country (adj.)

1767, of roads, "lying or directed across fields or open country," from cross- + country, or a shortening of across-country. Of flights, from 1909. As a noun, "outdoor distance running as a sport," by 1956.

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cross-pollination (n.)

"transfer of pollen from the male reproductive organ of one plant to the female reproductive organ of another plant," 1880, from cross- + pollination.

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cross-hair (n.)

also crosshair, cross-hairs, "very fine line (originally spider's silk) stretched across the focal plane of a telescope or microscope, forming a cross with another," 1755 of a telescope, 1780 in gunnery, from cross- + hair (n.). Also often in early 19c. spider-line, spider's-line (1819).

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cross-breed (v.)

1670s, from cross- + breed (v.). As a noun from 1774. Related: Cross-breeding; cross-bred.

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cross-bun (n.)

type of bun indented on top with an X, used especially on Good Friday, 1733, from cross (n.) + bun.

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double-cross (n.)

"act of treachery," 1834, from double (adj.) + cross (n.) in the sense of "pre-arranged swindle or fix." Originally to win a race after promising to lose it (to cheat in cheating, hence the double). As a verb from 1903, "to cheat," American English. Related: Double-crossed; double-crosser; double-crossing.

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cross-cut (adj.)

"used for cutting crosswise," 1820, from cross (adv.) + cut (v.). As a verbal phrase, "to cut transversely," from 1590s. An old name for a cross-cut saw was thwart-saw (mid-15c.).

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cross-street (n.)

"a street crossing another," 1704, from cross- + street.

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cross-beam (n.)

"large beam going from wall to wall; girder which holds the sides of a building or ship together," c. 1400, from cross- + beam (n.).

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