Etymology
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intoxicate (v.)

mid-15c., "to poison" (obsolete), from Medieval Latin intoxicatus, past participle of intoxicare "to poison," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin toxicare "to poison," from toxicum "poison" (see toxic). Meaning "make drunk" first recorded 1570s (implied in intoxicated). Figurative sense "excite to a high pitch of feeling" is attested from 1590s. Related: Intoxicating.

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intonate (v.1)

"to intone, recite in a singing voice," 1795, from Medieval Latin intonatus, past participle of intonare "sing according to tone" (see intone). Compare Italian intonare, French entonner. Related: Intonated; intonating.

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intone (v.2)

obsolete 17c.-18c. verb, from French entoner "thunder, roar, resound, reverberate," from Latin intonare "to thunder, resound," figuratively "to cry out vehemently," from tonare "to thunder" (see thunder (n.)). Related: Intoned; intoning.

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automatize (v.)

1837, "to make into an automaton, make into a self-acting machine;" see automaton + -ize. The meaning "to make automatic" is attested by 1952 (see automatic (adj.)). Related: Automatized; automatizing.

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immerge (v.)

1620s (trans.), "immerse, plunge into (a fluid)," from Latin immergere "to dip, plunge into" (see immersion). Intransitive sense from 1706. Rare; the usual verb is immerse. Related: Immerged; immerging.

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scrap (v.1)

"to make into scrap, consign to a scrap-heap, break up (machinery) into scrap-iron," 1883 (in reference to locomotives), from scrap (n.1). Related: Scrapped; scrapping; scrappable.

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wad (v.)

1570s, "put a wad into," from wad (n.). From 1670s as "form into a wad;" 1759 as "pad or stuff with wadding." Related: Wadded; wadding.

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investigation (n.)

early 15c., from Old French investigacion (14c.), from Latin investigationem (nominative investigatio) "a searching into, a searching for," noun of action from past participle stem of investigare "to trace out, search after," figuratively "search into, investigate," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "a footprint, a track" (see vestige).

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originate (v.)

1650s, "to trace the origin of;" also "to bring into existence, give rise or origin to," probably a back-formation from origination. Intransitive sense of "to arise, come into existence" is from 1775. Related: Originated; originating.

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segment (v.)

1859 (implied in segmented), "divide or become divided into segments," in reference to cell division, from segment (n.). Transitive sense, "divide (something) into segments" is from 1872. Related: Segmenting.

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