Etymology
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intone (v.2)
obsolete 17c.-18c. verb, from French entoner "thunder, roar, resound, reverberate," from Latin intonare "to thunder, resound," figuratively "to cry out vehemently," from tonare "to thunder" (see thunder (n.)). Related: Intoned; intoning.
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dock (v.2)

 "to bring or place (a ship) into a dock," 1510s, from dock (n.1). Intransitive sense of "to come into a dock" is by 1892. Of spaceships, by 1951. Related: Docked; docking

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immigrate (v.)
"to pass into a place as a new inhabitant or resident," especially "to move to a country where one is not a native, for the purpose of settling permanently there," 1620s, from Latin immigratus, past participle of immigrare "to remove, go into, move in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + migrare "to move" (see migration). Related: Immigrated; immigrating.
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wad (v.)
1570s, "put a wad into," from wad (n.). From 1670s as "form into a wad;" 1759 as "pad or stuff with wadding." Related: Wadded; wadding.
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automatize (v.)

1837, "to make into an automaton, make into a self-acting machine;" see automaton + -ize. The meaning "to make automatic" is attested by 1952 (see automatic (adj.)). Related: Automatized; automatizing.

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code (v.)

"to put into code," 1815, from code (n.). Specifically "to put into computer code" from 1947. Intransitive sense "write computer code" is by 1987. Related: Coded; coding.

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shredded (adj.)

"torn into shreds," 1570s, past-participle adjective from shred (v.). Shredded wheat, grain cut into long filaments, frequently eaten for breakfast, is recorded from 1885.

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segment (v.)

1859 (implied in segmented), "divide or become divided into segments," in reference to cell division, from segment (n.). Transitive sense, "divide (something) into segments" is from 1872. Related: Segmenting.

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originate (v.)

1650s, "to trace the origin of;" also "to bring into existence, give rise or origin to," probably a back-formation from origination. Intransitive sense of "to arise, come into existence" is from 1775. Related: Originated; originating.

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plunge (v.)

late 14c., plungen, "to put, throw, or thrust violently into; immerse, submerge," also intransitive, from Old French plongier "plunge, sink into; plunge into, dive in" (mid-12c., Modern French plonger), from Vulgar Latin *plumbicare "to heave the lead," from Latin plumbum "lead" (see plumb (n.)). Original notion perhaps is of a sounding lead or a fishing net weighted with lead. Figurative sense of "cast into some state or condition" (despair, etc.) is from late 14c. Related: Plunged; plunging. Plunging neckline in women's fashion is attested from 1949.

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