Etymology
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self-seeking (n.)

"a seeking after one's own benefit (before those of others), undue attention to one's self-interest," 1580s, from self + seeking, verbal noun from seek. As an adjective from 1620s.

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demagogic (adj.)

"relating to or like a demagogue, given to pandering to the rabble from self-interest," 1794; see demagogue + -ic. Greek had demagogikos "fit for or like a demagogue." Related: Demagogical (1734).

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fund (v.)
1776, "convert (a debt) into capital or stock represented by interest-bearing bonds," from fund (n.). Meaning "supply (someone or something) with money, to finance" is from 1900.
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preterist (n.)

"one who favors the past, one whose chief interest is in the past," 1864, from preter- "before" + -ist. As a theological term from 1843, "one who holds that the Apocalyptic prophecies have been nearly or entirely fulfilled" (opposed to futurist).

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hippomania (n.)
"excessive fondness for horses" (especially in reference to the intense and passionate interest in horses developed in some girls between ages 10 and 14), 1956, from hippo- "horse" + mania.
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pool (v.2)

"to make a common interest or fund, put things into one common fund or stock for the purpose of dividing or redistribution in certain proportions," 1871, from pool (n.2). Related: Pooled; pooling.

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lioness (n.)
"female lion," c. 1300, leoness, from lion + -ess. From late 14c., of persons, "fierce or cruel woman." From 1590s as "woman who is boldly public;" from 1808 as "woman who is a focus of public interest."
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surrender (n.)
early 15c., in law, "a giving up" (of an estate, land grant, interest in property, etc.), from Anglo-French surrendre, Old French surrendre noun use of infinitive, "give up, deliver over" (see surrender (v.)).
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superpower (n.)
1944, in geopolitical sense of "nation with great interest and ability to exert force in worldwide theaters of conflict," from super- + power (n.). The word itself is attested in physical (electrical power) senses from 1922.
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circular (n.)

1550s, "circular figure," from circular (adj.). Meaning "a notice circulated, a printed paper intended for general circulation" is from 1818, short for circular letter (1650s), one directed to a certain circle of persons and addressing a common interest.

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