Etymology
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theremin (n.)

electronic musical instrument, 1927, from the name of its inventor, Russian engineer Léon Thérémin (1896-1993).

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percussionist (n.)

"player of a percussion instrument," 1921, from percussion + -ist. Earlier "one who uses a percussion gun" (1817).

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voltmeter (n.)
instrument for measuring the difference of potentials in volts, 1882, from volt + meter (n.3).
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rammer (n.)

"instrument for driving by impact," mid-15c., agent noun from ram (v.).

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can-opener (n.)
"instrument for opening one end of a sealed tin can," 1868, from can (n.) + opener.
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pycnometer (n.)

"instrument for determining the relative density of solid bodies," by 1858; see pycno- + -meter.

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radiometric (adj.)

"pertaining to the radiometer or to experiments performed by it," 1877, from radiometer "instrument to transform radiant energy into mechanical work" (1875), radiometry, from radio-, here indicating "radiant energy," + -metric. Previously radiometer was the name of an old cross-staff instrument for measuring angles. Radiometric dating is attested from 1906.

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bagpipes (n.)
"musical wind instrument consisting of a leather bag and pipes," late 14c., from bag (n.) + pipe (n.1). Related: Bagpipe. Known to the ancients and originally a favorite instrument in England as well as the Celtic lands. By 1912 English army officers' slang for them was agony bags. Related: Bagpiper (early 14c.).
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appliance (n.)

1560s, "action of putting into use," from apply + -ance. The meaning "instrument, thing applied for a purpose" is from 1590s.

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brush (n.1)
"instrument consisting of flexible material (bristles, hair, etc.) attached to a handle or stock," late 14c., "dust-sweeper, a brush for sweeping," from Old French broisse, broce "a brush" (13c., Modern French brosse), perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bruscia "a bunch of new shoots" (used to sweep away dust), perhaps from Proto-Germanic *bruskaz "underbrush." Compare brush (n.2). As an instrument for applying paint, late 15c.; as an instrument for playing drums, 1927. Meaning "an application of a brush" is from 1822.
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