Etymology
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hagged (adj.)
c. 1700, from hag, by influence of haggard. Originally "bewitched," also "lean, gaunt," as bewitched persons and animals were believed to become.
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overawe (v.)

"subdue or control by fear or superior influence," 1570s, from over- + awe (v.). Perhaps coined by Spenser. Related: Overawed; overawing.

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Sauk (2)
southern Coastal Salishan group of Native Americans, from a native Lushootseed name, probably folk-etymologized by influence of Sauk (1).
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carnelian (n.)

"red variety of chalcedony," variant of cornelian, altered by influence of Latin carnem "flesh" (see carnation) because of its color.

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benignant (adj.)
"kind, gracious, favorable," 1739, from benign on model of its opposite, malignant. From 1790 as "exerting a good influence." Related: Benignantly; benignancy.
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auspices (n.)

plural (and now the usual form) of auspice (1530s), "observation of birds for the purpose of taking omens," from French auspice (14c.), from Latin auspicum "divination from the flight of birds; function of an auspex" (q.v.).

The meaning "any indication of the future (especially favorable)" is from 1650s; it is attested earlier (1630s) in extended sense of "benevolent influence of greater power, influence exerted on behalf of someone or something," originally in the expression under the auspices of.

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fletch (v.)
"fit feathers to" (an arrow), 1650s, variant of fledge (v.) in sense "fit (an arrow) with feathers, altered by influence of fletcher. Related: Fletched; fletching.
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predominance (n.)

"quality of being predominant; superiority in power, authority, or influence," c. 1600; see predominant + -ance. Related: Predominancy (1590s).

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tidbit (n.)
1630s, probably from dialectal tid "fond, solicitous, tender" (perhaps by influence of tit (n.2)) + bit (n.1) "morsel."
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Venusian (n.)
"(hypothetical) inhabitant of the second planet from the sun," 1866, from Venus + -ian. Middle English had Venerian "one under the influence of the planet Venus; a lover" (late 14c.).
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