Etymology
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caca (n.)
"excrement," c. 1870, slang, probably from Spanish or another language that uses it, ultimately from PIE root *kakka- "to defecate," which forms the base word for "excrement, to void excrement" in many Indo-European languages.
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Ahura Mazda 
from Avestan ahura- "spirit, lord," from Indo-Iranian *asuras, from suffixed form of PIE root *ansu- "spirit" (see Aesir) + Avestan mazda- "wise," from PIE *mens-dhe- "to set the mind" (from root *men- (1) "to think" + root *dhe- "to set, put").
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ah (interj.)
mid-15c., an expression of surprise, delight, disgust, or pain in nearly all Indo-European languages, but not found in Old English (where the equivalent expression was la!), so perhaps from Old French a "ah!, oh! woe!"
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*dhwer- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "door, doorway." The base form is frequently in dual or plural, leading to speculation that houses of the original Indo-Europeans had doors with two swinging halves.

It forms all or part of: afforest; deforest; door; faubourg; foreclose; foreign; forensic; forest; forfeit; forum; hors d'oeuvre; thyroid.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit duárah "door, gate;" Old Persian duvara- "door;" Lithuanian dùrys (plural); Greek thyra "door;" Latin foris "out-of-doors, outside;" Gaulish doro "mouth;" Old Prussian dwaris "gate;" Russian dver' "a door;" Old English dor, German Tür "door," Gothic dauro "gate."

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cyan (n.)

"greenish-blue color," 1889, short for cyan blue (1879), from Greek kyanos "dark blue, dark blue enamel, lapis lazuli," probably a non-Indo-European word, but perhaps akin to, or from, Hittite *kuwanna(n)- "copper blue."

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Hyrcania 
ancient region southeast of the Caspian Sea, from Greek Hyrkania, said to be from an Indo-European *verkana "country of wolves" [Zonn, I., et al., "The Caspian Sea Encyclopedia," 2010]. "Hyrcania was the wild region par excellence to the ancients" [OED]. Related: Hyrcanian.
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Nostratic (adj.)

pertaining to a proposed meta-family of languages including Indo-European, Semitic, Altaic, and Dravidian, 1966 (Nostratian is from 1931), from Latin nostratis "of our country," from nostras "our countrymen," plural of nostrum, neuter of noster "our," from nos "we" (from PIE *nes- (2); see us).

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Farsi (n.)
"the modern Persian language," 1878, from the usual Iranian word for it, from Fars, the Arabic form of Pars (no "p" in Arabic), the name of a region in southwestern Iran, where the modern language evolved from Persian (an Indo-European language), to which many Arabic (Semitic) elements have been added.
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gn- 
consonant cluster at the head of some words; the -g- formerly was pronounced. Found in words from Old English (gnat, gnaw), in Low German, and Scandinavian as a variant of kn- (gneiss), in Latin and Greek (gnomon, gnostic) and representing sounds in non-Indo-European languages (gnu).
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terebinth (n.)
Mediterranean tree, a member of the sumac family, late 14c., from Old French therebint (13c.), from Latin terebinthus (Pliny), from Greek terebinthos, earlier terminthos, probably from a non-Indo-European language (Klein suggests Creto-Minoic). The tree is the source of Chian turpentine. Related: Terebinthine; terebinthaceous.
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