Etymology
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bleach (n.)

1881, "a bleaching agent;" 1882, "an act of bleaching;" probably directly from bleach (v.). The Old English noun blæce meant "leprosy;" Late Old English had also blæco "paleness," and Middle English had blech "whitening or bleaching agent," but the modern words seem to be independent late 19c. formations from the verb.

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realist (n.)

17c., in philosophy, in senses clustered around the notion of "one who believes in the real existence of the external world, independent of all thought about it," from real (adj.) + -ist, and compare French réaliste. Also see realism. Meaning "artist or writer working by the principles of artistic realism" is by 1870.

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polygenesis (n.)

"plurality of origins," in biology, "generation or origination from several separate and often independent germs; as a doctrine, equivalent to special creation; originally and often specifically in reference to the view that the human race consists of several distinct species, 1858, from poly- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." Also see polygeny.

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floater (n.)
"one who or that which floats," 1717, agent noun from float (v.). From 1847 in political slang for an independent voter (but with suggestion of purchasability); 1859 as "one who frequently changes place of residence or employment." Meaning "dead body found in water" is 1890, U.S. slang.
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solidarity (n.)
1829, from French solidarité "communion of interests and responsibilities, mutual responsibility," a coinage of the "Encyclopédie" (1765), from solidaire "interdependent, complete, entire," from solide (see solid (adj.)). With a capital S-, the name of an independent trade union movement in Poland, formed September 1980, from Polish Solidarność.
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Latvia 
Baltic nation, first independent in 1918, named for its inhabitants, Latvian Latvji, whose ancient name is of unknown origin. In English, the people name was Lett. Parts of the modern state were known previously as Livonia (from Estonian liiv "sand") and Courland (from Curonians, the name of a Lettish people, which is of unknown origin). Related: Latvian.
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autocratic (adj.)
"holding unlimited and independent powers of government," 1815 (in reference to Napoleon), from French autocratique, from autocrate, from Latinized form of Greek autokrates (see autocrat). Earlier autocratoric (1670s) was directly from Greek autokratorikos "of or for an autocrat, despotically." Autocratical is attested from 1767 (in reference to Elizabeth I).
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obbligato (adj.)

musical instruction, used of accompaniments (especially by a single instrument, to a vocal piece), "so important that it cannot be omitted," 1724, from Italian obbligato, literally "obligated," from Latin obligatus, past participle of obligare "to bind" (see oblige). As a noun, "an accompaniment of independent importance," by 1817.

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Israel 
Old English Israel, "the Jewish people, the Hebrew nation," from Latin Israel, from Greek, from Hebrew yisra'el "he that striveth with God" (Genesis xxxii.28), symbolic proper name conferred on Jacob and extended to his descendants, from sara "he fought, contended" + El "God." As the name of an independent Jewish state in the Middle East, it is attested from 1948. Compare Israeli, Israelite.
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asquint (adv.)

early 13c., "obliquely, with a sidelong glance," of uncertain etymology; from a- (1) "on" + "a word corresponding to Du. schuinte 'slope, slant' of the independent use of which no instances survive ..." [OED]. The Middle English Compendium compares French équinter "cut to a point;" French dialectal (e)squintar "cast a glance, look furtively." Squint is not found in Middle English, and appears to be from this word.

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