Etymology
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categorical (adj.)
1590s, as a term in logic, "unqualified, asserting absolutely," from Late Latin categoricus, from Greek kategorikos "accusatory, affirmative, categorical," from kategoria (see category). General sense of "explicit, unconditional" is from 1610s. Categorical imperative, from the philosophy of Kant, first recorded 1827. Related: Categorically.
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facsimile (n.)
"exact copy," 1690s, two words, from Latin fac simile "make similar," from fac imperative of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put") + simile, neuter of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). One-word form predominated in 20c. As an adjective from 1877
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territorial (adj.)
1620s, "of or pertaining to a territory," from Late Latin territorialis, from territorium (see territory). In reference to British regiments, from 1881. In reference to an area defended by an animal, from 1920. Territorial waters is from 1841. Territorial army "British home defense" is from 1908. Territorial imperative "animal need to claim and defend territory" is from 1966.
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valediction (n.)
"a farewell, a bidding farewell," 1610s, from past participle stem of Latin valedicere "bid farewell, take leave," from vale "farewell!," second person singular imperative of valere "be well, be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong") + dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").
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oyez (interj.)

a call for silence and attention; the introduction to a proclamation made by an officer of a law-court," early 15c., from Anglo-French oyez "hear ye!" (late 13c., Old French oiez), a cry uttered (usually thrice) to call attention, from Latin subjunctive audiatis, plural imperative of audire "to hear" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive").

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hallelujah 
also halleluiah, 1530s, from Late Latin hallelujah, alleluia, from Greek allelouia, from Hebrew hallalu-yah "praise ye Jehovah," from hallalu, plural imperative of hallel "to praise" also "song of praise," from hillel "he praised," of imitative origin, with primary sense being "to trill." Second element is yah, shortened form of Yahweh, name of God. Earlier English form alleluia (12c.) is from Old French alleluie.
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chanty (n.)

1856, also shanty, chantey "song with a boisterous chorus, sung by sailors while heaving or hoisting anything heavy;" probably an alteration of French chanter "to sing," from Latin cantare "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). Perhaps the immediate source is French chantez, imperative of chanter. The purpose was to enable them to pull or heave together in time with the song.

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rendezvous (n.)

1590s, "place appointed for assembling of troops," from French rendez-vous, noun use of rendez vous "present yourselves," from the wording of orders, from rendez, second person plural imperative of rendre "to present" (see render (v.)) + vous "you" (from Latin vos, from PIE *wos- "you" (plural)). General sense of "appointed place of meeting" is attested from 1590s; from c. 1600 as "a meeting held by appointment."

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allocate (v.)
"to set aside for a special purpose," 1630s, from Medieval Latin allocate (the common first word of writs authorizing payment), imperative plural of allocare "allocate, allot," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place" (see locus). It is a twin of allow. Related: Allocated; allocating. English allocate as an adjective from mid-15c. in legal use.
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dele (v.)

"take out, remove," typographer's direction to remove a letter, 1727, ultimately from Latin delere "destroy, blot out, efface" (see delete), perhaps via dele, imperative singular, or deleatur "let it be deleted," third person singular present passive subjunctive (which itself was used in English from c. 1600). Usually expressed by a distinctive script form of "d".

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