Etymology
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pedicle (n.)

"small stalk-like structure from an organ in an animal body," 1620s, from French pedicule or directly from Latin pediculus "footstalk, little foot," diminutive of pedem (nominative pes) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot."

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footprint (n.)

"the mark of a foot," especially in walking, 1550s, from foot (n.) + print (n.). Related: Footprints. Old English had fotspor, fotswæð.

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pedestal (n.)

1560s, "base supporting a column, statue, etc.; that which serves as a foot or support," from French piédestal (1540s), from Italian piedistallo "base of a pillar," from pie "foot" (from Latin pes "foot;" from PIE root *ped- "foot") + di "of" + Old Italian stallo "stall, place, seat," from a Germanic source (see stall (n.1)). The spelling in English was influenced by Latin pedem "foot." An Old English word for it was fotstan, literally "foot-stone." Figurative sense of put (someone) on a pedestal "regard as highly admirable" is attested by 1859.

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petiole (n.)

"footstalk of a leaf, the support by which the blade of a leaf is attached to the stem," 1753, from French pétiole (18c.), from Late Latin petiolus, a misspelling of peciolus "stalk, stem," literally "little foot," diminutive of pediculus "foot stalk," itself a diminutive of pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Given its modern sense by Linnaeus. Related: Petiolar; petiolate.

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footstep (n.)
early 13c., "footprint," from foot (n.) + step (n.). Meaning "a tread or fall of the foot" is first attested 1530s. Figurative expression to follow in (someone's) footsteps is from 1540s.
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plunge (n.)

c. 1400, "a deep pool," from plunge (v.). From late 15c. as "a sudden pitch forward;" meaning "act of plunging, a sudden immersion in something" is from 1711. Figurative use in take the plunge "commit oneself" is by 1823, from an earlier noun sense of "point of being in trouble or danger, immersion in difficulty or distress" (1530s); the exact phrase might owe its popularity to its appearance in "The Vicar of Wakefield" (1766), which everybody read:

Mr. Thornhill's assurance had entirely forsaken him : he now saw the gulph of infamy and want before him, and trembled to take the plunge. He therefore fell on his knees before his uncle, and in a voice of piercing misery implored compassion.
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gastropod (n.)
1826, gasteropod (spelling without -e- by 1854), from Modern Latin Gasteropoda, name of a class of mollusks, from Greek gaster (genitive gastros) "stomach" (see gastric) + pous (genitive podos) "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). From the ventral position of the mollusk's "foot."
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trivet (n.)
three-legged iron stand, 12c., trefet, probably from a noun use of Latin tripedem (nominative tripes) "three-footed," from tri- "three" (see three) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
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cap-a-pie (adj.)

"all over" (in reference to dress or armor), 1520s, from French cap-à-pie, literally "head to foot." The more usual French form is de pied en cap. The French words are from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head") + pedem "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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