Etymology
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notional (adj.)

1590s, "pertaining to or expressing a notion or notions," from notion + -al (earlier nocional, late 14c., from Medieval Latin notionalis). Meaning "full of whims, dealing in imaginary things" is from 1791. Grammatical sense is from 1928 (Jespersen); economics use is from 1958.

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nadir (n.)

late 14c., in astronomy, "imaginary point of the celestial sphere vertically opposite to the zenith of the sun; the inferior pole of the horizon," from Medieval Latin nadir, from Arabic nazir "opposite to," in nazir as-samt, literally "opposite direction," from nazir "opposite" + as-samt "road, path" (see zenith). Transferred sense of "lowest point" of anything is recorded by 1793.

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Cockaigne (n.)

"imaginary country of abundance and bliss, the abode of luxury and idleness, lubberland," c. 1300, from Old French Cocaigne (12c.), which is of obscure origin; speculation centers on words related to cook (v.) and cake (compare Middle Dutch kokenje, a child's honey-sweetened treat; also compare Big Rock Candy Mountain). The German equivalent is Schlaraffenland ("Land of Lazy Monkeys").

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incubus (n.)

"imaginary being or demon, credited with causing nightmares, and, in male form, consorting with women in their sleep," c. 1200, from Late Latin incubus (Augustine), from Latin incubo "nightmare, one who lies down on (the sleeper)," from incubare "to lie upon" (see incubate). Plural is incubi. Compare succubus.

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snark (n.)

imaginary animal, coined 1876 by Lewis Carroll in "The Hunting of the Snark." In 1950s, name of a type of U.S. cruise missile, and in 1980s, of a type of sailboat. Meaning "caustic, opinionated, and critical rhetoric" is from c. 2002, probably from snarky and not directly related, if at all, to Lewis Carroll's use of snark.

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collocate (v.)

"to set or place together," 1510s, from Latin collocatus, past participle of collocare "to arrange, place together, set in a place," from assimilated form of com "together" (see com-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place" (see locus). Related: collocated; collocating.

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emplacement (n.)

"a putting or fixing in place; a place or site," 1742, formerly also implacement; from French emplacement "place, situation," from verb emplacer, from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + placer "to place" from place "place, spot" (see place (n.)). Military sense of "the space within a fortification allotted for the position and service of a gun or battery" is attested from 1811.

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itinerate (v.)

"to travel from place to place," c. 1600, from Late Latin itineratus, past participle of itinerare "to travel" (see itinerant). Especially "to travel from place to place preaching" (1775). Related: Itinerated; itinerating.

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locality (n.)

1620s, "fact of having a place," from French localité (16c.), from Late Latin localitatem (nominative localitas) "locality" (as a quality of bodies), from localis "belonging to a place, pertaining to a place," from Latin locus "a place, spot" (see locus). Meaning "a geographical place or district" is from 1830.

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displace (v.)

1550s, "remove to a different place, put out of the usual place; remove from any position, office, or dignity," from Old French desplacer (15c., Modern French déplacer), from des- (see dis-) + placer "to place," from place "place, spot" (see place (n.)). Related: Displaced; displacing. Displaced person "refugee" is from 1944.

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