Etymology
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maltreat (v.)

"to treat ill, abuse," 1708, from French maltraiter, or formed in English from mal- + treat (v.). Related: Maltreated; maltreating.

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wanton (n.)
"one who is ill-behaved," mid-15c., especially "lascivious, lewd person" (1520s), from wanton (adj.).
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simpleton (n.)
1640s, probably a jocular formation from simple and -ton, suffix extracted from surnames. Compare skimmington, personification of an ill-used spouse, c. 1600.
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unwell (adj.)
mid-15c., "somewhat ill," from un- (1) "not" + well (adj.). Similar formation in North Frisian unwel, German unwohl.
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aegrotat (n.)
certificate that a student is ill, Latin, literally "he is sick," third person singular of aegrotare "to be sick," from aeger "sick."
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disaster (n.)
Origin and meaning of disaster

"anything that befalls of ruinous or distressing nature; any unfortunate event," especially a sudden or great misfortune, 1590s, from French désastre (1560s), from Italian disastro, literally "ill-starred," from dis-, here merely pejorative, equivalent to English mis- "ill" (see dis-) + astro "star, planet," from Latin astrum, from Greek astron "star" (from PIE root *ster- (2) "star").

The sense is astrological, of a calamity blamed on an unfavorable position of a planet, and "star" here is probably meant in the astrological sense of "destiny, fortune, fate." Compare Medieval Latin astrum sinistrum "misfortune," literally "unlucky star," and English ill-starred.

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clownery (n.)

1580s, "condition or character of a clown; ill-breeding, rudeness of manners," from clown (n.) + -ery. From 1823 as "performance of a comic clown."

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heartsick (adj.)
also heart-sick, "despondent," late 14c., from heart (n.) + sick (adj.). Old English heortseoc meant "ill from heart disease."
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misguided (adj.)
"erring in purpose or action," 1650s, past-participle adjective from misguide (v.). Earlier, "ill-behaved" (late 15c.). Related: Misguidedly; misguidedness.
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inapt (adj.)
"ill-suited to the purpose or occasion," 1734, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + apt. Related: Inaptly; inaptness. Compare inept.
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