Etymology
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colonialist (n.)

"supporter of a colonial system," by 1850, from colonial + -ist; compare colonist.

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Babism (n.)

religious and social system founded in 19c. Persia, 1850; see Baha'i.

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systematic (adj.)

1670s, "pertaining to a system," from French systématique or directly from Late Latin systematicus, from Greek systematikos "combined in a whole," from systema (genitive systematos); see system. From 1789 as "methodical," often in a bad sense, "ruthlessly methodical." Related: Systematical (1660s); systematically.

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closed (adj.)

"made shut, not open," c. 1200, past-participle adjective from close (v.). Closed circuit "complete, unbroken (electrical) circuit" is attested from 1827; closed shop"workplace in which only union members are employed" is from 1904; closed system first recorded 1896 in William James as "complete and unalterable system (of doctrines, etc.)." Later used in a physical sense, "system in which the total mass or energy remains constant."

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Buddhism (n.)

"the religious system founded by the Buddha in India," 1801, from Buddha + -ism.

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neuropathy (n.)

"disease of the nervous system," 1827, from neuro- + -pathy. Related: Neuropath; neuropathic; neuropathist.

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maglev 

system of rail transportation using two sets of magnets, 1973, a contraction of magnetic levitation.

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feudalism (n.)

a coinage of historians, attested from 1773; see feudal + -ism. Feudal system attested from 1736.

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parasympathetic (adj.)

in reference to major divisions of the nervous system, 1905, from para- (1) "beside" + sympathetic.

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androcentrism (n.)

"the system or doctrine of having males at the center," 1915; see androcentric + -ism.

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