Etymology
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icing (n.)

1769 in the confectionery sense, "coating of concreted sugar," verbal noun of ice (v.). Earlier in this sense was simple ice (1723); frosting came later. Meaning "process of becoming covered with ice" is from 1881.

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roller-skate (n.)

also rollerskate, "a skate mounted on small wheels instead of iron or steel runners," 1861, American English, from roller + skate (n.2). The verb is from 1885. Related: Roller-skated; roller-skater; roller-skating.

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axel (n.)

skating jump, 1930, named for Norwegian skater Axel Paulsen (1855-1938). The name is said to be derived from the Old Testament name Absalom.

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post-glacial (adj.)

"subsequent to the Ice Age," 1855, from post- + glacial.

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piolet (n.)

"ice-axe used by Alpine climbers," 1868, from Savoy French piolet "climber's ice-axe" (19c.), diminutive of piolo "axe," which is perhaps from Medieval Latin piola "plane, scraper."

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skate (n.2)

"an ice-skate, a contrivance for enabling a person to glide swiftly on ice," 1660s, skeates (plural), from Dutch schaats (plural schaatsen), a singular mistaken in English for plural, from Middle Dutch schaetse. The word and the custom were brought to England after the Restoration by exiled followers of Charles II who had taken refuge in Holland.

The Dutch word is perhaps from Old North French escache "a stilt, trestle," related to Old French eschace "stilt" (French échasse), from Frankish *skakkja "stilt" or a similar Germanic source (compare Frisian skatja "stilt"), perhaps literally "thing that shakes or moves fast" and related to root of Old English sceacan "to vibrate" (see shake (v.)). Or perhaps [Klein] the Dutch word is connected to Middle Low German schenke, Old English scanca "leg" (see shank). If the former, the sense alteration in Dutch from "stilt" to "skate" is not clearly traced. The latter theory perhaps is supported by evidence that the original ice skates, up to medieval times, were leg bones of horse, ox, or deer, strapped to the feet with leather strips.

The sense in English was extended to roller-skates by 1876. The meaning "an act of skating" is from 1853. A slightly older word for an ice skate was scrick-shoe (1650s), from Middle Dutch scricschoe, from schricken "to slide." 

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glaciate (v.)

1620s, "to freeze;" 1861 in reference to glaciers, from Latin glaciatus, past participle of glaciare "to turn to ice," from glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze"). Related: Glaciated; glaciating.

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glaciation (n.)

1640s, "act of freezing," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin glaciare "to freeze," from glacies "ice" (probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze"). Geological sense of "presence of a mass of ice covering a region" is from 1863.

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iceberg (n.)

1774, "glacier humped like a hill;" 1820 as "detached piece of a glacier or ice pack at sea," partial loan-translation of Dutch ijsberg, literally "ice mountain," from ijs "ice" (see ice (n.)) + berg "mountain" (from PIE root *bhergh- (2) "high," with derivatives referring to hills and hill-forts.). Similar formation in Norwegian isberg, Danish isbjerg.

Earlier English terms were sea-hill (1690s), island of ice (1610s). Phrase tip of the iceberg in a figurative sense (in allusion to most of it being unseen underwater) first recorded 1962. Iceberg lettuce attested from 1893, apparently originally a trade name.

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glacier (n.)

1744, from French glacier (16c.), from Savoy dialect glacière "moving mass of ice," from Old French glace "ice," from Vulgar Latin *glacia (source also of Old Provençal glassa, Italian ghiaccia), from Latin glacies "ice," probably from a suffixed form of PIE root *gel- "cold; to freeze." The German Swiss form gletscher also was used in English (1764).

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