Etymology
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ichor (n.)

"ethereal fluid that serves for blood in the veins of the gods," 1630s, from French ichor (16c.) or Modern Latin ichor, from Greek ikhōr, a word of unknown origin, possibly from a non-Indo-European language. Related: Ichorous.

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ichthyology (n.)

"the science of fishes; the department of zoology which treats of fishes," 1640s, from ichthyo- "fish" + -logy. Related: Ichthyologist; ichthyological.

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ichthyomorphic (adj.)

"fish-shaped," 1870 in biology, 1879 in mythology, from ichthyo- "fish" + -morphic, from Greek morphē "form, shape," a word of uncertain etymology.

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ichthyophagous (adj.)
"fish-eating," 1791, from Latinized form of ikhthyophagos "fish-eating;" see ichthyo- + -phagous. Related: Ichthyophagist (1727).
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ichthyosaur (n.)
extinct aquatic reptile, 1830, Modern Latin, from Latinized form of Greek ikhthys "fish" (see ichthyo-) + -saurus. Related: Ichthyosaurus (1819); ichthyosaurian.
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ichthyosis (n.)

congenital disease of the epidermis, 1815, coined in Modern Latin (1801); see ichthyo- + -osis. So called for the hard dry scales and plates which form on the skin. 

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icicle (n.)

"pendent mass of ice tapering downward to a point, formed by the freezing of drops of water flowing down from the place of attachment," early 14c., isykle, from is "ice" (see ice (n.)) + Middle English ikel, a word that by itself meant "icicle," from Old English gicel "icicle, ice" (found in compounds, such as cylegicel "chill ice"), from Proto-Germanic *jekilaz (source also of Old Norse jaki "piece of ice," diminutive jökull "icicle, ice; glacier;" Old High German ihilla "icicle"), from PIE *yeg- "ice" (source also of Middle Irish aig "ice," Welsh ia). Dialectal ickle "icicle" survived into 20c.

The latter element came to lose its independent meaning, and has suffered under popular etymology; explained in books as a mere dim. termination -icle, as in article, particle, etc., it appears transformed in the obs. or dial. forms ice-sickle, ise-sicklc, ice-shackle, ice-shoggle, OSc. iceshogle, icechokill, etc. [Century Dictionary]
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icing (n.)
1769 in the confectionery sense, "coating of concreted sugar," verbal noun of ice (v.). Earlier in this sense was simple ice (1723); frosting came later. Meaning "process of becoming covered with ice" is from 1881.
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ickle (adj.)
childish pronunciation of little (adj.), attested by 1846.
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icky (adj.)
1935, American English, probably from icky-boo (c. 1920) "sickly, nauseated," which probably is a baby talk elaboration of sick (adj.). Originally a swing lover's term for more sentimental jazz music; in general use, "sticky and repulsive," from 1938. Also a noun, "person with conventional taste in jazz," 1937.
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