Etymology
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pedicle (n.)

"small stalk-like structure from an organ in an animal body," 1620s, from French pedicule or directly from Latin pediculus "footstalk, little foot," diminutive of pedem (nominative pes) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot."

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monopode (n.)

"one of a fabulous race of men believed to live in the tropics and have but one leg with a single enormous foot," 1816, from Modern Latin monopodes, from mono- "single" + pod-, stem of Greek pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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footprint (n.)

"the mark of a foot," especially in walking, 1550s, from foot (n.) + print (n.). Related: Footprints. Old English had fotspor, fotswæð.

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pedestal (n.)

1560s, "base supporting a column, statue, etc.; that which serves as a foot or support," from French piédestal (1540s), from Italian piedistallo "base of a pillar," from pie "foot" (from Latin pes "foot;" from PIE root *ped- "foot") + di "of" + Old Italian stallo "stall, place, seat," from a Germanic source (see stall (n.1)). The spelling in English was influenced by Latin pedem "foot." An Old English word for it was fotstan, literally "foot-stone." Figurative sense of put (someone) on a pedestal "regard as highly admirable" is attested by 1859.

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preterhuman (adj.)

"more than human, beyond what is human," 1803, from preter- "beyond" + human (adj.). Used to avoid the specific connotations of superhuman.

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footstep (n.)

early 13c., "footprint," from foot (n.) + step (n.). Meaning "a tread or fall of the foot" is first attested 1530s. Figurative expression to follow in (someone's) footsteps is from 1540s.

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petiole (n.)

"footstalk of a leaf, the support by which the blade of a leaf is attached to the stem," 1753, from French pétiole (18c.), from Late Latin petiolus, a misspelling of peciolus "stalk, stem," literally "little foot," diminutive of pediculus "foot stalk," itself a diminutive of pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Given its modern sense by Linnaeus. Related: Petiolar; petiolate.

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anthropomorphous (adj.)

"having human form; anthropoid in form" (of apes, etc.), 1753, Englishing of Late Latin anthropomorphus "having human form," from Greek anthrōpomorphos "of human form," from anthrōpos "human being" (see anthropo-) + morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Related: Anthropomorphously.

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gastropod (n.)

1826, gasteropod (spelling without -e- by 1854), from Modern Latin Gasteropoda, name of a class of mollusks, from Greek gaster (genitive gastros) "stomach" (see gastric) + pous (genitive podos) "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). From the ventral position of the mollusk's "foot."

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anthropic (adj.)

"pertaining to a human being," 1836, from Greek anthrōpikos "human; of or for a man," from anthrōpos "male human being, man" (see anthropo-). Related: Anthropical (1804).

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