Etymology
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dog-tired (n.)

"as tired as a dog after a long chase," 1806.

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dog-tooth (n.)

"canine tooth of a human," late 14c., from dog (n.) + tooth.

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frankfurter (n.)
"hot dog," 1894, American English, from German Frankfurter (wurst) "(sausage) of Frankfurt," so called because the U.S. product resembled a type of smoked-beef-and-pork sausage originally made in Germany, where it was associated with the city of Frankfurt am Main (literally "ford of the Franks" on the River Main). Attested from 1877 as Frankfort sausage.
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canivorous (adj.)
"dog-eating," 1835, from Latin canis "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + -vorous "eating, devouring."
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canine (n.)
late 14c., "a pointed tooth," from Latin caninus "of the dog," genitive of canis "dog" (source of Italian cane, French chien), from PIE root *kwon- "dog." The meaning "a dog" is first recorded 1869.
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watchdog (n.)
also watch-dog, c. 1600, from watch (v.) + dog (n.). Figurative sense is attested by 1845.
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canicular (adj.)
late 14c., in caniculer dayes, the "dog days" around mid-August, from Latin canicularis "pertaining to the dog days or the Dog Star," from canicula "little dog," also "the Dog Star," diminutive of canis "a dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog"). In literal use ("pertaining to a dog") historically only as attempt at humor.

Also see Sirius, and compare heliacal. The ancient Egyptian canicular year was computed from the heliacal rising of Sirius; the canicular cycle of 1,461 years is how long it would take a given day to pass through all seasons in an uncorrected calendar.
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cynanthropy (n.)

"form of madness in which the afflicted imagines himself to be a dog," 1590s, from Latinized form of Greek kynanthropos "of a dog-man,"  from kyōn (genitive kynos) "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + anthrōpos "male human being, man" (see anthropo-).

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cynocephalic (adj.)

"having a head like a dog," 1825, from Latin, from Greek kyōn (genitive kynos) "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog") + kephalikos "pertaining to the head," from kephalē "head" (see cephalo-). Middle English had cino-cephales "fabled race of dog-headed creatures" (c. 1300).

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pooch (n.)

"dog," 1917, American English, of unknown origin. Earlier it was a dog name, attested as such by 1901 as the name of a dog owned by Dick Craine, "the Klondike pioneer" (the article in the May 12 Buffalo Courier reports: " 'Pooch' is the Alaskan name for whisky, and although the dog is not addicted to the use of this stimulant, he is a genuine Eskimo dog, and, therefore, it is appropriate"). Harvard coach "Pooch" Donovan also was much in the news during the early years of 20c.

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