Etymology
Advertisement
ewigkeit (n.)

1877, from German, literally "eternity," from ewig "everlasting" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity") + -keit word-forming element meaning "state or condition of being" (see -hood).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sisterhood (n.)
"state of being a sister," late 14c., from sister + -hood. Meaning "a society of sisters" (usually a religious order) is from 1590s; sense of "women having some common characteristic or calling" is from c. 1600.
Related entries & more 
-head 
word-forming element meaning "state or condition of being," Middle English -hede, from a variant of Old English -had, the source of -hood. The only surviving words with it are maidenhead and godhead.
Related entries & more 
slothful (adj.)

c. 1400, from sloth + -ful. Related: Slothfully; slothfulness. For the latter, Middle English had also sloth-head (c. 1300), with Middle English -hede, cognate with -hood.

Related entries & more 
-cy 
abstract noun suffix of quality or rank, from Latin -cia, -tia, from Greek -kia, -tia, from abstract ending -ia (see -ia) + stem ending -c- or -t-. The native correspondents are -ship, -hood.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
neighborhood (n.)

mid-15c., "neighborly conduct, mutual friendliness," from neighbor (n.) + -hood. Modern sense of "community of people who live close together" is recorded by 1620s. Phrase in the neighborhood of meaning "near, somewhere about" is by 1857, American English. The Old English word for "neighborhood" was neahdæl. Middle English had neighborship (early 14c.), "neighborliness; neighborly acts," later "state of being neighbors."

Related entries & more 
hade (n.)
"person; state, condition," Old English had "person, individual, character, individuality; condition, state, nature; sex, race, family, tribe;" see -hood. Obsolete after 14c. Cognate with Old Saxon hed "condition, rank, Old Norse heiðr "honor, dignity," Old High German heit, Gothic haidus "way, manner."
Related entries & more 
livelihood (n.)
1610s, alteration of livelode "means of keeping alive" (c. 1300), from Old English liflad "course of life," from lif "life" (see life) + lad "way, course" (see load (n.)). Similar formation in Old High German libleita "provisions." Spelling assimilated to words in -hood. Earlier livelihood was a different word, meaning "liveliness," from lively.
Related entries & more 
-red 

word-forming element meaning "condition or state of," Middle English, from Old English -rede, from ræden "condition, rule, reckoning," a suffixed form of ræd "to advise, rule" (see rede). Common in Old English, less so in Middle English but still active in word-formation. It is analogous to -hood, which has replaced it in brotherhood, neighborhood, etc.; it survives in about 25 words. 

Related entries & more 
Adelaide 
fem. proper name, from French Adélaide, from a Germanic source similar to Old High German Adalhaid, from adal "noble family" (see atheling) + German heit "state, rank," which is related to Old English -had "person, degree, state, nature" (see -hood). The first element affixed to French fem. ending -ine gave Adeline.
Related entries & more 

Page 4