Etymology
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medievalist (n.)

1847, "proponent of medieval styles, one who sympathizes with the spirit and principles of the Middle Ages," from medieval + -ist. From 1882 as "one versed in the history of the Middle Ages."

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Parnellite (n.)

in Irish history, 1881, a political adherent of the Irish Home Rule policy of Charles Stewart Parnell (1846-1891); with -ite (1). For the surname, see Petronilla.

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Ernestine 
fem. form of Ernest. As an adjective, in German history, "pertaining to the elder branch of the Saxon house," who descend from Ernest, Elector of Saxony 15c.
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slavocracy (n.)
also slaveocracy, in U.S. history, "the political dominance of slave-owners," 1840, formed irregularly from slave (n.) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Slavocrat.
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slaughterhouse (n.)

also slaughter-house, late 14c., "place where animals are butchered for meat," from slaughter (n.) + house (n.). The Slaughter-house cases in U.S. history were 1873.

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azoic (adj.)

"pertaining to the period of Earth's history before life appeared," 1843, with -ic + Greek azōos, from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + zōon "animal," here used in the sense "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."

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peerage (n.)

mid-15c., "peers collectively," from peer (n.) + -age. Probably on model of Old French parage. Meaning "rank or dignity of a peer" is from 1670s. In titles of books containing a history and genealogy of the peers, by 1709.

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Lecompton 
in U.S. history, a reference to the town in Kansas Territory where a constitution for statehood was drawn up in 1857 by pro-slavery men.
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mid-Atlantic (n.)

by 1804, "the middle of the Atlantic Ocean," from mid (adj.) + Atlantic. In U.S. history, Mid-Atlantic states in reference to the middle states on the Atlantic coast is by 1842.

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C.E. 
abbreviation of Common Era or Christian Era, a secular or non-Christian alternative to A.D., attested from 1838 in works on Jewish history. Companion B.C.E. is attested from 1881.
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