Etymology
Advertisement
veto (n.)

1620s, from Latin veto, literally "I forbid," first person singular present indicative of vetare "forbid, prohibit, oppose, hinder," of unknown origin. In ancient Rome, the "technical term for protest interposed by a tribune of the people against any measure of the Senate or of the magistrates" [Lewis].

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
preventive (adj.)

"serving to prevent or hinder; guarding against or warding off," 1630s, from Latin praevent-, past-participle stem of praevenire "come or go before, anticipate" (see prevent), + -ive. As a noun, "something taken or done beforehand," from 1630s; in medical use from 1670s. Related: Preventively; preventiveness.

Related entries & more 
prohibit (v.)

"forbid, interdict by authority," early 15c., prohibiten, from Latin prohibitus, past participle of prohibere "hold back, restrain, hinder, prevent," from pro "away, forth" (see pro-) + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). For form, compare inhibit, exhibit. Related: Prohibited; prohibiting.

Related entries & more 
prohibitive (adj.)

early 15c., prohibitif, "having the quality of prohibiting, serving to forbid," from Medieval Latin prohibitivus, from prohibit-, past-participle stem of Latin prohibere "hold back, restrain, hinder, prevent" (see prohibit). Of prices, rates, etc., "so high as to prevent use," it is from 1886. Related: Prohibitively. Alternative prohibitory (1590s) is from Latin prohibitorius.

Related entries & more 
impede (v.)

c. 1600, back-formation from impediment, or else from Latin impedire "impede, be in the way, hinder, detain," literally "to shackle the feet," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." Related: Impeded; impedes; impeding; impedient.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
posterior (n.)

"buttocks, the hinder parts of the body of a human or animal," euphemistic, 1610s, from posterior (adj.). Earlier it meant "those who come after, posterity" (1530s). Compare Lithuanian pasturas "the last, the hindmost," from pas "at, by." Middle English had partes posterialle "the buttocks" (early 15c.), from Latin posterioras with a change of suffix.

Related entries & more 
back (v.)

mid-15c., "to keep something back, hinder," from back (adv.). The meaning "cause to move back" is from 1781. The intransitive sense of "move or go back" is from late 15c. The meaning "furnish with a back or backing" is from 1728, from back (n.). The meaning "to support" (as by a bet) is attested from 1540s. Related: Backed; backing.

Related entries & more 
bilk (v.)

1650s, from or along with the noun (1630s), first used as a cribbage term; as a verb, "to spoil (someone's) score." Of obscure origin, it was believed in 17c. to be "a word signifying nothing;" some sources suggest it is a thinned form of balk "to hinder." The meaning "to defraud" is recorded from 1670s. Related: Bilked; bilking.

Related entries & more 
deprive (v.)

mid-14c., depriven, "to take away; to divest, strip, bereave; divest of office," from Old French depriver, from Medieval Latin deprivare, from de- "entirely" (see de-) + Latin privare "to deprive, rob, strip" of anything; "to deliver from" anything (see private (adj.) ). From late 14c. as "hinder from possessing." Replaced Old English bedælan. Related: Deprived; depriving.

Related entries & more 
block (v.1)

"obstruct, hinder passage from or to," 1590s, from French bloquer "to block, stop up," from Old French bloc "log, block of wood" (see block (n.1)). Compare Dutch blokkeren, German blockieren "to blockade." The sense in cricket is from 1772; in U.S. football, "stop or obstruct another player," from 1889. Related: Blocked; blocking.

Related entries & more 

Page 4