Etymology
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tumulous (adj.)
1727, from Latin tumulosus "full of hills," from tumulus "hill, mound, heap of earth" (see tumulus).
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Huntingdon 
Old English Huntandun (973) "Hill of the Huntsman" (or of a man called Hunta).
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Phnom Penh 
Cambodian capital, literally "mountain of plenty," from Cambodian phnom "mountain, hill" + penh "full."
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Onondaga 

a people of the Iroquois confederacy, 1680s, named for its principal settlement, from Onondaga onontake, literally "on the hill."

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Malabar 

coastal region in southwest India, from Malayalam (Dravidian) mala "hill" + varam "slope." Related: Malabarian; Malabarese.

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sand-bank (n.)

"hill of sand formed in a river or sea by tides and currents," 1580s; see sand (n.) + bank (n.2).

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iceberg (n.)

1774, "glacier humped like a hill;" 1820 as "detached piece of a glacier or ice pack at sea," partial loan-translation of Dutch ijsberg, literally "ice mountain," from ijs "ice" (see ice (n.)) + berg "mountain" (from PIE root *bhergh- (2) "high," with derivatives referring to hills and hill-forts.). Similar formation in Norwegian isberg, Danish isbjerg.

Earlier English terms were sea-hill (1690s), island of ice (1610s). Phrase tip of the iceberg in a figurative sense (in allusion to most of it being unseen underwater) first recorded 1962. Iceberg lettuce attested from 1893, apparently originally a trade name.

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Vatican 

1550s, from Latin mons Vaticanus, Roman hill on which Papal palace stands. By Klein's sources said to be an Etruscan loan-word and unrelated to vates "soothsayer, prophet, seer" (see vates), but most others seem to think it is related, on the notion of "hill of prophecy" (compare vaticinatio "a foretelling, soothsaying, prophesying," vaticinari "to foretell").

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Samos 

Greek island in the Aegean, from Old Greek samos "a height, dune, seaside hill." Many references to it are as the birthplace of Pythagoras.

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kop (n.)
"hill," 1835, from Afrikaans, from Dutch kop "head," from the Germanic form of the root of English cup (n.); compare German Kopf "head."
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