Etymology
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restorative (adj.)

"capable of restoring health or strength," late 14c., restoratif, from Old French restoratif, restauratif, from restorer (see restore) or from Medieval Latin restaurativus.

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constitutional (n.)

"a constitutional walk," 1829, probably originally among university students, and probably short for constitutional walk or exercise; from constitutional (adj.) in the "beneficial to bodily health" sense.

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balsamic (adj.)
c. 1600, "health-giving," from balsam + -ic. From 1640s as "pertaining to balsam," 1670s as "yielding balsam," 1714 as "aromatic, fragrant." Balsamic vinegar is by 1849.
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salud (interj.)

toast before drinking, Spanish, literally "(good) health;" attested in English by 1931. French equivalent salut is attested in English by 1921.

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recover (v.)

c. 1300, recoveren, "to regain consciousness," also "regain health or strength after sickness, injury, etc.," from Anglo-French rekeverer (13c.), Old French recovrer "come back, return; regain health; procure, get again" (11c.), from Medieval Latin recuperare "to recover" (source of Spanish recobrar, Italian ricoverare; see recuperation).

The sense of "get (anything) back, get or regain possession or control of," literally or figuratively, after it has been lost, is attested from mid-14c. In law, "obtain by judgment or legal proceedings," late 14c. The transitive sense of "restore from sickness, restore (another) to health" is from c. 1600; that of "rescue, save from danger" is from 1610s. Related: Recovered; recovering. To recover arms (1680s) is to bring the piece from the position of "aim" to that of "ready."

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nutritionist (n.)

"one whose profession is advising on matters of food and nutrition and their effect on health," 1926, from nutrition + -ist.

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salubrity (n.)

"healthfulness, state or character of being healthful," early 15c., salubrite, Old French salubrite and directly from Latin salubritas, from salubris "promoting health, healthful" (see salubrious).

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sanatorium (n.)

by 1839 as "hospital, usually private, for the treatment of invalids, convalescents, etc., who might benefit from open air;" by 1842 as "place to which people go for the sake of health or to regain health;" Modern Latin, noun use of neuter of Late Latin adjective sanitorius "health-giving," from Latin sanat-, past-participle stem of sanare "to heal," from sanus "well, healthy, sane" (see sane).

Latin sanare is the source of Italian sanare, Spanish sanar. Century Dictionary [1895] notes it was "specifically applied to military stations on the mountains or tablelands of tropical countries, with climates suited to the health of Europeans."

Many of his patients had asked him what this hard word sanatorium meant, and he explained to them, that it was a lodging-house, which was, in fact, the proper alias of sanatorium, and that it was to the benefit of Dr. Arnott's stove and of regularity in the time of giving medicine. [from report on a "Debate on the Sanatorium" in The Lancet, Jan. 11, 1840]
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convalesce (v.)

"to grow better after sickness, make progress toward the recovery of health," late 15c., from Latin convalescere "thrive, regain health, begin to grow strong or well," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + valescere "to begin to grow strong," inchoative of valere "to be strong" (from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). Only in Caxton and Scottish writers until 19c. Related: Convalesced; convalescing.

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healing (n.)
"restoration to health," Old English hæling, verbal noun from heal (v.). Figurative sense of "restoration of wholeness" is from early 13c.; meaning "touch that cures" is from 1670s.
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