Etymology
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headmaster (n.)
principal of a school or seminary, 1570s, from head (adj.) + master (n.).
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headphone (n.)
1887, from head (n.) + second element extracted from telephone (n.). Related: Headphones.
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meathead (n.)
"stupid person," 1945, from meat + head (n.).
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jughead (n.)
"klutz, stupid person," 1926, from jug (n.) + head (n.).
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headsman (n.)
"executioner," c. 1600, from genitive of head (n.) + man (n.). Used earlier in sense "chief, leader" (c. 1400).
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headstone (n.)
c. 1400, "cornerstone," from head (adj.) + stone (n.). Meaning "upright stone at the head of a grave" is 1775, from head (n.).
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header (n.)
"head-first dive or plunge," 1849, from head (n.); as a type of pass or shot with the head in soccer, by 1906. Earlier it meant "executioner, headsman" (mid-15c.).
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drumhead (n.)

also drum-head, "membrane stretched upon a drum," 1620s, from drum (n.) + head (n.).

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blackhead (n.)
"comedo," 1837, from black (adj.) + head (n.). So called for its appearance.
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heading (n.)
c. 1300, "a beheading," from present participle of head (v.). Meaning "an advancing in a certain direction" is from c. 1600. Meaning "title at the head of a portion of text" is from 1849.
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