Etymology
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arrow-head (n.)
also arrowhead, late 15c., from arrow + head (n.). Ancient ones dug up were called elf-arrows (17c.).
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good-for-nothing (adj.)
"worthless," 1711, from adjectival phrase (see good (adj.)).
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tit for tat 
1550s, possibly an alteration of tip for tap "blow for blow," from tip (v.3) "tap" + tap "touch lightly." Perhaps influenced by tit (n.2).
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free-for-all (n.)
"mass brawl" (one in which all may participate), 1918, from earlier adjective use (1868), especially in reference to open horse races, American English. Earlier as a noun in reference to free-for-all horse and motorcar races.
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head over heels (adv.)
1726, "a curious perversion" [Weekley] of Middle English heels over head (late 14c.) "somersault fashion," hence "recklessly." Head (n.) and heels long have been paired in alliterative phrases in English, and the whole image also was in classical Latin (per caput pedesque ire).
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Muscat 
capital of Oman, from Arabic Masqat, said to mean "hidden" (it is isolated from the interior by hills).
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beal (n.)
"mouth of a river or valley, opening between hills," 1818 (in Scott), from Gaelic beul "mouth."
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tumulous (adj.)
1727, from Latin tumulosus "full of hills," from tumulus "hill, mound, heap of earth" (see tumulus).
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capo (n.2)
"pitch-altering device for a stringed instrument," 1946, short for capo tasto (1876), from Italian, literally "head stop," from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head") + tasto "key; touch."
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Cotswold 

range of hills in Gloucestershire, literally "wold where there are sheep-cotes;" see cote + wold. Related: Cotswolds.

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