Etymology
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well-acquainted (adj.)
1728, "having good acquaintance with," from well (adv.) + acquainted.
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osmatic (adj.)

"having a good sense of smell, having well-developed olfactory organs," 1878, from French osmatique, apparently coined by Paul Broca, from Greek osmē "smell, scent, odor" from PIE root *hed- "to smell" (see odor). Related: Anosmatic.

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many-sided (adj.)

"having many sides," 1650s; see many + side (n.).

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megacephalic (adj.)

"having an unusually large head," 1876; see mega- + -cephalic.

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-minded 
"having a mind" (of a certain type), from mind (n.).
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intentioned (adj.)
"having intentions" (of a specified kind), 16c., from intention + -ed.
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sapid (adj.)

1630s, "having the power of affecting the organs of taste," from Latin sapidus "savory, having a taste," from sapere (see sapient). Also figurative, "gratifying to the mind or its tastes." Its opposite is insipid. Related: Sapidness; sapidity.

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wall-eyed (adj.)

c. 1300, wawil-eghed, wolden-eiged, "having very light-colored eyes," also "having parti-colored eyes," from Old Norse vagl-eygr "having speckled eyes," from vagl "speck in the eye; beam, upper cross-beam, chicken-roost, perch," from Proto-Germanic *walgaz, from PIE *wogh-lo-, suffixed form of root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle." The prehistoric sense evolution would be from "weigh" to "lift," to "hold, support." Meaning "having one or both eyes turned out" (and thus showing much white) is first recorded 1580s.

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Christless (adj.)

"having no faith in Christ, unchristian," 1650s, from Christ + -less.

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mononuclear (adj.)

"having a single nucleus," 1866; see mono- "single" + nuclear.

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