Etymology
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tingle (v.)

late 14c., "to have a ringing sensation when hearing something," also "to have a stinging or thrilling feeling," variation of tinkelen (see tinkle). Related: Tingled; tingling. The noun is first recorded 1700 in reference to sound, 1848 in reference to sensation.

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suspect (n.)

"a suspected person, one imagined on more or less evidence to have committed a crime or offense," 1590s, from suspect (adj.). Earlier as a noun it meant "a suspicion, mistrust" (late 14c.), especially in have (or hold) in suspect "be suspicious of."

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Smirnoff (n.)

proprietary name of a brand of vodka, said to have been in use since 1914.

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coulda 

in writing, to indicate the common casual pronunciation of could have, by 1909.

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disgust (v.)
Origin and meaning of disgust

c. 1600, "have a strong distaste for or repugnance to," from French desgouster "have a distaste for" (16c.), from desgoust "distaste," also "strong dislike" (see disgust (n.)).

The sense has strengthened over time in English, and subject and object have been reversed; the older use looks like this: "It is not very palatable, which makes some disgust it" (1660s). The reverse sense of "to excite nausea and loathing in" is attested from 1640s. Related: Disgusted; disgusting.

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beddable (adj.)

"sexually attractive," 1941, from bed (v.) in the "have sex with" sense + -able.

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misbetide (v.)

"have bad fortune, experience defeat," c. 1400, from mis- (1) + betide. Now obsolete.

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shoulda 

verbal phrase, by 1902, representing casual (American) pronunciation of should have. The use of a or 'a to represent a loose pronunciation of have as an auxiliary verb is attested from mid-14c. and was all but standard English until 17c. It pairs well with coulda and woulda.

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habit (v.)

mid-14c., "to dwell, reside; dwell in" (obsolete), from Old French habiter, abiter "to dwell, inhabit; have dealings with," from Latin habitare "to live, dwell; stay, remain," frequentative of habere "to have, to hold, possess" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Meaning "to dress" is from 1580s. Related: Habited; habiting.

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