Etymology
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in-store (adj.)

also instore, 1954, from in (prep.) + store (n.). In Middle English, instore was a verb meaning "to restore, renew," from Latin instaurare.

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shoo-in (n.)

"easy winner" (especially in politics), 1939, from earlier sense of "horse that wins a race by pre-arrangement" (1937), from the verbal phrase shoo in "allow to win easily" (1908); see shoo (v.) + in (adv.).

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trade-in (n.)

1917, in reference to used cars, from verbal phrase, from trade (v.) + in (adv.).

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in-patient (n.)

also inpatient, "person lodged and fed, as well as treated, at a hospital or infirmary," 1760, from in (adj.) + patient (n.). As an adjective by 1890.

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in-itselfness (n.)

1879, in philosophy; see in (adv.) + itself + -ness.

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in-fighting (n.)

1816, in pugilism, the practice of getting at close quarters with an opponent; see in + fighting. Old English infiht (n.) meant "brawl within a house or between members of a household." Middle English had infight (v.) "to attack" (c. 1300); the modern verb infight "fight at close quarters" (1916) appears to be a back-formation from in-fighting. Related: In-fighter (1812).

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buy-in (n.)

"act of obtaining an interest in," 1970, from verbal phrase buy in "to purchase a commission or stock" (1826), from buy (v.) + in (adv.). To buy into "obtain an interest in by purchase" (as of stock shares) is recorded from 1680s.

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in-between (n.)

1815, "an interval;" also "a person who intervenes," noun use of prepositional phrase, from in (adv.) + between. Related: In-betweener (1912); in-betweenity (1927).

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in utero 

1713, Latin, literally "in the uterus," from ablative of uterus (see uterus).

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in memoriam 

Latin, literally "in memory of," from accusative of memoria "memory" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). The phrase was much-used in Latin writing; Tennyson's poem of that name (published in 1850) seems to have introduced the phrase to English.

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