Etymology
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antalgic (adj.)
"alleviating pain," 1775, from Greek ant-, form of anti- used before vowels (see anti-), + algos "pain" (see -algia) + -ic. As a noun, "preparation which alleviates pain," 1753.
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registrant (n.)

"one who registers; one who enters his or her name in a list for some purpose," 1879; see register (v.) + -ant. An earlier word was registerer (1560s).

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un- (2)
prefix of reversal, deprivation, or removal (as in unhand, undo, unbutton), Old English on-, un-, from Proto-Germanic *andi- (source also of Old Saxon ant-, Old Norse and-, Dutch ont-, Old High German ant-, German ent-, Gothic and- "against"), from PIE *anti "facing opposite, near, in front of, before, against" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before").

More or less confused with un- (1) through similarity in the notions of "negation" and "reversal;" an adjective such as unlocked might represent "not locked" (un- (1)) or the past tense of unlock (un- (2)).
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decongestant (n.)

"a decongestive agent," by 1950; see de- + congest + -ant. Related: Decongestion (1901); decongest (v.), by 1912; decongestive (adj.), by 1922.

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myrmidon (n.)

one of a warlike people of ancient Thessaly, legendarily ruled by Achilles and accompanying him to Troy, c. 1400, from Latin Myrmidones (plural), from Greek Myrmidones, Thessalian tribe led by Achilles to the Trojan War, fabled to have been ants changed into men, and often derived from Greek myrmex "ant" (from PIE *morwi- (see Formica (2)), but Watkins does not connect them and Klein's sources suggest a connection to Greek mormos "dread, terror." Transferred sense of "faithful unquestioning follower," often with a suggestion of unscrupulousness, is from c. 1600.

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formication (n.)
crawling sensation as of ants on the skin, 1707, from Latin formicationem (nominative formicatio), noun of action from formicare "to crawl like ants," from formica "ant" (see Formica (n.2)).
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antacid (n.)
"alkali used as a remedy for acidity in the stomach," 1732, medical hybrid from anti- (which is shortened to ant- before vowels and -h-) + acid (n.). Also from 1732 as an adjective.
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anterior (adj.)
"more in front; earlier," 1610s, Latin, literally "former," comparative of ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before"). Related: Anteriorly (1590s); anteriority.
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Antaeus 
Libyan giant slain by Herakles, from Latinized form of Greek Antaios, literally "opposite, opposed to, hostile," from anta "over against, face to face," related to anti "opposite, against" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before").
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retardant (adj.)

"tending to hinder," 1640s, from retard (v.) + -ant or from Latin retardantem (nominative retardans), present participle of retardare. From 1867 as a noun, "retardant substance, substance that inhibits some phenomenon or process."

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