Etymology
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asymmetry (n.)
1650s, "want of symmetry or proportion," from Greek asymmetria "want of proportion or harmony," abstract noun from asymmetros "having no common measure; disproportionate, unsymmetrical," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + symmetros "commensurable" (see symmetry).
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wavelength (n.)
also wave-length, 1850, "distance between peaks of a wave," from wave (n.) + length. Originally of spectra; radio sense is attested by 1925. Figurative sense of "mental harmony" is recorded from 1927, on analogy of radio waves.
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concord (v.)

late 14c., "reconcile, bring into harmony" (transitive); c. 1400, "agree, cooperate," from Old French concorder and directly from Latin concordare "be of one mind," from concors "of the same mind" (see concord (n.)). Related: Concorded; concording.

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doo-wop 

style of American vocal group music, usually performed acapella or with minimal instrumentation, 1958, from a typical example of the nonsense harmony phrases sung under the vocal lead (this one, doo-wop, being attested from mid-1950s). Compare bebop, scat (n.1).

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abhorrent (adj.)
Origin and meaning of abhorrent
1610s, "recoiling (from), strongly opposed to," from Latin abhorentem (nominative abhorrens) "incongruous, inappropriate," present participle of abhorrere "shrink back from, be remote from, be out of harmony with" (see abhor). Meaning "repugnant, loathesome" is from 1650s. Earlier was abhorrable (late 15c.).
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raga (n.)

in Indian music, a melodic framework for improvised melodies, 1788, from Sanskrit raga-s "harmony, melody, mode in music," literally "color, mood," related to rajyati "it is dyed," from PIE *reg- (3) "to dye" (source also of Greek rhegos "blanket, rug").

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anachronism (n.)
1640s, "an error in computing time or finding dates," from Latin anachronismus, from Greek anakhronismos, from anakhronizein "refer to wrong time," from ana "against" (see ana-) + khronos "time" (see chrono-). Meaning "something out of harmony with a specified time" is first recorded 1816.
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jibe (v.)
"agree, fit," 1813, gibe, of unknown origin, originally U.S. colloquial, perhaps a figurative extension of earlier jib, gybe (v.) "shift a sail or boom" (see jib). OED, however, suggests a phonetic variant of chime, as if meaning "to chime in with, to be in harmony." Related: Jibed; jibes; jibing.
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correspondence (n.)

early 15c., "congruence, resemblance, harmony, agreement," from Medieval Latin correspondentia, from correspondentem (nominative correspondens), present participle of correspondere "correspond, harmonize, reciprocate," from assimilated form of com "together, with (each other)" (see com-) + respondere "to answer" (see respond). Sense of "communication by letters" is first attested 1640s; that of "the letters which pass between correspondents" is from 1771.

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congruence (n.)

mid-15c., "suitableness or appropriateness of one thing to another," from Latin congruentia "agreement, harmony, congruity," from congruen-, present-participle stem of congruere "agree, correspond with," literally "to come together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + a lost verb *gruere, *ruere "fall, rush" (see congruent). Meaning "fact or condition of according or agreeing" is from 1530s. Related: Congruency.

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