Etymology
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harden (n.)

c. 1200, transitive, "make (something) hard," from hard (adj.) + -en (1). Intransitive meaning "to become hard" is late 14c. The earlier verb was simply hard, from Old English heardian. Related: Hardened; hardening.

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soused (adj.)

"drunk," 1610s, from past participle of souse (v.), on notion of one "pickled" in liquor.

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guzzle (n.)

1590s, "a drain," from guzzle (v.). From 1704 as "liquor," 1836 as "bout of heavy drinking."

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snootful (n.)

"as much (liquor) as one can take," 1885, from snoot (n.) + -ful.

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bub (n.2)

"strong drink of any kind," especially malt liquor, 1670s, perhaps imitative of the sound of drinking.

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slog (n.)

1846, "a hard hit," from slog (v.). Sense of "spell of hard work" is from 1888.

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obduration (n.)

c. 1400, obduracioun, "hard-heartedness; defiant impenitence," from Late Latin obdurationem (nominative obduratio) "a hardening," noun of state from past-participle stem of Latin obdurare "harden, render hard; be hard or hardened" (see obdurate).

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sneaky (adj.)

1833, from sneak (v.) + -y (2). Related: Sneakily; sneakiness. Sneaky Pete "cheap liquor" is from 1949.

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hardship (n.)

c. 1200, "quality of being hard" (obsolete), from hard (adj.) + -ship. Meaning "disadvantage, suffering, privation" is c. 1400.

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rotgut (n.)

also rot-gut, "unwholesome liquor; cheap, adulterated whiskey," 1630s, from rot (v.) + gut (n.).

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