Etymology
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grist (n.)
Old English grist "action of grinding; grain to be ground," perhaps related to grindan "to grind" (see grind (v.)), though OED calls this connection "difficult." Meaning "wheat which is to be ground" is early 15c., as is the figurative extension from this sense.
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links (n.)
"undulating sandy ground," 1728, from Scottish/Northumbrian link "sandy, rolling ground near seashore, a crook or winding of a river," from Old English hlinc "rising ground, ridge;" perhaps from the same Proto-Germanic root as lean (v.). The Scottish word for the type of landscape where golf was born; the word has been part of the names of golf courses at least since 1728. The southern form of the word was Middle English linch "rising ground, especially between plowed fields or along a chalk down," which persisted in dialect.
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link (n.3)
"undulating sandy ground," especially in a golf course; see links.
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plain (n.)

"level country, expanse of level or nearly level ground," c. 1300 (in reference to Salisbury Plain), from Old French plain "open countryside," from Latin planum "level ground, plain," noun use of neuter of planus (adj.) "flat, even, level" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread"). Latin planum was used for "level ground" but much more common was campus.

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terrain (n.)
1727, "ground for training horses," from French terrain "piece of earth, ground, land," from Old French (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *terranum, from Latin terrenum "land, ground," noun use of neuter of terrenus "of earth, earthly," from terra "earth, land," literally "dry land" (as opposed to "sea"); from PIE root *ters- "to dry." Meaning "tract of country, considered with regard to its natural features" first attested 1766.
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clop (v.)
1897, echoic of the sound of boots or hoofs on the ground. Related: Clopped; clopping.
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ARVN (n.)
acronym for Army of the Republic of Vietnam, ground military force of South Vietnam, organized 1955.
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rooty (adj.)

of ground, "abounding in roots," late 15c., from root (n.) + -y (2).

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mid-air (n.)

also midair, "the part of the air between the clouds and the air near the ground," from mid (adj.) + air (n.1).

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downspout (n.)

"pipe conveying rainwater from a roof to the ground or a drain," by 1829, from down (adv.) + spout (n.).

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