Etymology
Advertisement
Hellenic (adj.)

"pertaining to Greece," 1640s, from Greek Hellēnikos "Hellenic, Greek," from Hellēn "a Greek," a word of unknown origin; traditionally from the name of an eponymous ancestor, Hellēn, son of Deucalion. To Homer the Hellenes were a small tribe in southern Thessaly (his word for one of the Greek-speaking peoples is our Achaean). In modern use in the arts, Hellenic is used of Greek work from the close of the primitive phase to the time of Alexander the Great or the Roman conquest (succeeded by the Hellenistic).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
an- (1)

privative prefix, from Greek an-, "not, without" (from PIE root *ne- "not"). The Greek prefix is a fuller form of the one represented in English by a- (3).

Related entries & more 
melanoma (n.)

"tumor containing melanin," 1826, medical Latin, from Greek melas (genitive melanos) "black" (see melano-) + -oma. Greek melanōma meant "blackness."

Related entries & more 
chiastic (adj.)

"of the nature of a chiasmus," 1856, from Latinized form of Greek khiastos "arranged diagonally; marked with an X" (i.e., resembling the Greek letter chi) + -ic.

Related entries & more 
Poseidon (n.)

Greek god of the sea and earthquakes, one of the chief Olympians, a brother of Zeus, Greek Poseidon (Doric Poteidan), a name of uncertain origin. Related: Poseidonian.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hexapod (n.)

"six-footed insect," 1660s, from Modern Latin hexapod-, stem of hexapodus, from Greek hex "six" (see six) + Greek pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Greek hexapous (adj.) was used only with reference to poetic meter. As an adjective from 1856.

Related entries & more 
Daedalus 

father of Icarus in Greek mythology, builder of the Cretan labyrinth, from Latin Daedelus, from Greek Daidalos, literally "the cunning worker," from or related to daidallein "to work artfully, embellish," a word of disputed etymology. Beekes writes, "we should consider Pre-Greek origin." Related: Daedalian.

Related entries & more 
sternocleidomastoid (adj.)

medical Latin, from sterno- "sternum," Greek sternon "breast, breastbone," or Latin sternum (see sternum) + Latinized Greek kleis (see clavicle) + mastoid.

Related entries & more 
greeking (n.)

in typography or composition, "text rendered in random characters or symbols" (not necessarily Greek; lorem ipsum is a form of it), also the rendition of text into such characters, by 1977, said to be from the sense in expression Greek to me "unintelligible" (see Greek (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
mixo- 

word-forming element of Greek origin meaning "mixed," from Greek mixo-, from mixis "a mixing, mingling, intercourse," from root of mignynai "to mix, mix up, mingle" (from PIE root *meik- "to mix"). As in mixolydian in reference to a half-Lydian mode in ancient Greek music.

Related entries & more 

Page 4