Etymology
Advertisement
Majorca 

island in the Balearics, from Latin maior "larger," irregular comparative of magnus "large, great" (from PIE root *meg- "great"); so called because it is the largest of the three islands. Related: Majorcan.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
maharishi (n.)
Hindu sage or holy man, 1785, from Sanskrit, from maha "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + rishi "inspired sage." In general use, a title for a popular spiritual leader.
Related entries & more 
much (adj.)

c. 1200, "great in quantity or extent" (also "great in size, big, large," a sense now obsolete), a worn-down form (by loss of unaccented last syllable) of Middle English muchel "large, tall; many, in a large amount; great, formidable," from Old English micel "great in amount or extent," from Proto-Germanic *mekilaz, from PIE root *meg- "great."

As a noun, "a large quantity, a great deal," and as an adverb, "in a great degree, intensely, extensively," from c. 1200. Since 17c. the adverb has been much-used as a prefix to participial forms to make compound adjectives. For vowel evolution, see bury. Too much was used from late 14c. in the senses "astonishing, incredible," also "too offensive, unforgivable." Much-what "various things, this and that" (late 14c.) was "Very common in the 17th c." [OED] and turns up in an 1899 book of Virginia folk-speech as well as "Ulysses."

Related entries & more 
costly (adj.)

"of great price, occasioning great expense," late 14c., from cost (n.) + -ly (1). Earlier formation with the same sense were costful (mid-13c.), costious (mid-14c.). Related: Costliness.

Related entries & more 
Maratha 
state in southwestern India, also in reference to the Scytho-Dravidian race living there, 1763 (Mharatta), from Marathi Maratha, corresponding to Sanskrit Maharastrah, literally "great country," from maha- "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + rastra "kingdom," from raj "to rule" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
beaucoup 
French, literally "a great heap" (13c.), from beau "fine, great" (see beau (n.)) + coup "a stroke," also "a throw," hence, "a heap" (see coup (n.)). Compare Spanish golpe "multitude," from the same Latin source.
Related entries & more 
magnify (v.)

late 14c., magnifien, "to speak or act for the glory or honor (of someone or something)," from Old French magnefiier "glorify, magnify," from Latin magnificare "esteem greatly, extol, make much of," from magnificus "great, elevated, noble," literally "doing great deeds," from magnus "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Meaning "increase the apparent size of by use of a telescope or microscope" is from 1660s, said to be a development peculiar to English. Related: Magnified; magnifying. Magnifying glass is by 1650s.

Related entries & more 
mayor (n.)

"principal officer of a municipality, chief magistrate of a city or borough," c. 1300, mair, meir (mid-13c. as a surname), from Old French maire "head of a city or town government" (13c.), originally "greater, superior" (adj.), from Latin maior, major, comparative of magnus "great, large, big" (of size), "abundant" (of quantity), "great, considerable" (of value), "strong, powerful" (of force); of persons, "elder, aged," also, figuratively, "great, mighty, grand, important," from PIE *mag-no-, from root *meg- "great."

Mayoress is attested from late 15c. as "the wife of a mayor;" by 1863 as "woman holding the office of mayor."

Related entries & more 
greater 
Old English gryttra, Anglian *gretra; comparative of great.
Related entries & more 
magnanimity (n.)

mid-14c., "loftiness of thought or purpose, greatness of mind or heart, habit of feeling and acting worthily under all circumstances," from Old French magnanimité "high-mindedness, generosity of spirit," from Latin magnanimitatem (nominative magnanimitas) "greatness of soul, high-mindedness," from magnanimus "having a great soul," from magnus "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + animus "mind, soul, spirit" (see animus).

Probably a loan-translation of Greek megalopsykhos "high-souled, generous" (Aristotle) or megathymus "great-hearted." The narrower sense of "superiority to petty resentments or jealousies, generous disregard of injuries" (by 1771).

Related entries & more 

Page 4