Etymology
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aristocratic (adj.)
c. 1600, "pertaining to aristocracy," from French aristocratique, from Greek aristokratikos "belonging to the rule of the best," from aristokratia (see aristocracy). Meaning "grand, stylish, befitting the nobility" is from 1845. Related: Aristocratical (1580s); aristocratically.
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opry (n.)

1914, U.S. dialectal pronunciation of opera. Especially in Grand Ole Opry, a radio broadcast of country music from Nashville, registered as a proprietary name 1950.

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grandstand (n.)

"main seating for spectators at an outdoor event," 1761 (two words), from grand (adj.) + stand (n.). The verb meaning "to show off" is student slang from 1895, from grandstand player, attested in baseball slang from 1888.

It's little things of this sort which makes the 'grand stand player.' They make impossible catches, and when they get the ball they roll all over the field. [M.J. Kelly, "Play Ball," 1888]

Compare British gallery hit (1882) "showy play by a batsman in cricket, 'intended to gain applause from uncritical spectators'" [OED]. Related: grandstanding.

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grandmaster (n.)
as a chess title, 1927, from grand (adj.) in the sense "chief, principal" + master (n.). Earlier (as two words) a title in Freemasonry (1724) and in military orders of knighthood (1550s).
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grandiloquence (n.)
"lofty speaking or expression," 1580s, from Latin grandiloquentia, from grandiloquus "using lofty speech, bombastic," from grandis "big" (see grand (adj.)) + -loquus "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").
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presentment (n.)

c. 1300, "act of presenting," from Old French presentement "presentation (of a person) at a ceremony" (12c.), from presenter (see present (v.)). From c. 1600 as "anything presented or exhibited." In law, "statement by a grand jury of an offense without a bill of indictment" (mid-15c.).

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august (adj.)
"inspiring reverence and admiration, solemnly grand," 1660s, from Latin augustus "venerable, majestic, magnificent, noble," perhaps originally "consecrated by the augurs, with favorable auguries" (see augur (n.)); or else [de Vaan] "that which is increased" (see augment).
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lordly (adj.)
late 14c., "haughty, imperious," from Old English hlafordlic "of or pertaining to lords, noble;" see lord (n.) + -ly (1). From 1530s as "magnificent, on a grand scale, fit for a lord." As an adverb, "despotically," from mid-14c.
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Martin 

masc. proper name, from Latin Martinus, derivative of Mars (genitive Martis), Roman god of war (see Mars). In Elizabethan times, the parish of St. Martin-le-Grand in London was "celebrated as the resort of dealers in imitation jewellery" [OED].

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epic (adj.)

1580s, "pertaining to or constituting a lengthy heroic poem," via French épique or directly from Latin epicus, from Greek epikos, from epos "a word; a tale, story; promise, prophecy, proverb; poetry in heroic verse" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

Extended sense of "grand, heroic" is recorded in English by 1731. From 1706 as a noun in reference to an epic poem, "A long narrative told on a grand scale of time and place, featuring a larger-than-life protagonist and heroic actions" [Miller Williams, "Patterns of Poetry"]. Earlier as "an epic poet" (1630s).

I believe the word 'epic' is usually understood by English readers to mean merely a long and grand poem instead of a short slight one—at least, I know that as a boy I remained long under that impression myself. It really means a poem in which story-telling, and philosophical reflection as its accompaniment, take the place of dramatic action, and impulsive song. [Ruskin, "Elements of English Prosody, for use in St. George's Schools," 1880]
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