Etymology
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causative (adj.)

early 15c., "effective as a cause or agent," from Old French causatif, from Latin causativus, from causa "a cause, reason" (see cause (n.)). Meaning "expressing causation" is from c. 1600; hence the noun, in grammar, "a form of a noun or verb expressing causation" (1824).

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preterperfect (n.)

in grammar, "past perfect," applied to a tense which indicates a past or completed state or action, 1530s, from Late Latin praeteritum perfectum "complete past;" see preter- + perfect (adj.). Related: Preterpluperfect.

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Priscian (n.)

Late Latin Priscianus, name of the celebrated Roman grammarian (c. 500-530); commonly in the phrase break Priscian's head (1520s) "violate rules of grammar" (Latin diminuere Prisciani caput). For the name, see Priscilla.

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prosthetic (adj.)

1837, "exhibiting or pertaining to prosthesis in grammar;" 1902 in the surgical sense; from Latinized form of Greek prosthetikos "disposed to add," from prosthetos "added or fitted to," verbal adjective of prostithenai "to put to, add to" (see prosthesis). Related: Prosthetically.

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chiasmus (n.)

in grammar, "the arrangement of repeated, parallel, or contrasted words or phrases in pairs with inversion of word order," 1850, Latinized from Greek khiasmos "a placing crosswise, diagonal arrangement" (see chi).

Adam, first of men,
To first of women, Eve.
["Paradise Lost"]
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attribute (n.)
"quality ascribed to someone, distinguishing mark (especially an excellent or lofty one)," late 14c., from Latin attributum "anything attributed," in grammar, "predicate," noun use of neuter of attributus, past participle of attribuere "assign, allot; ascribe, impute" (see attribute (v.)). Distinguished from the verb by having stress on the first syllable.
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sutra (n.)
in Buddhism, "series of aphorisms" concerning ceremonies, rites, and conduct, 1801, from Sanskrit sutram "rule," literally "string, thread" (as a measure of straightness), from sivyati "sew," from PIE root *syu- "to bind, sew." Applied also to rules of grammar, law, philosophy, etc., along with their commentaries.
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dual (adj.)

c. 1600, in grammar, "the form or number relating to two," from Latin dualis "that contains two; the dual number, duality," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"). General sense of "relating to two, expressing two, composed or consisting of two parts" is from 1650s. Related: Dually.

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imperative (adj.)

1520s, in grammar, "expressing command," used of the form of a verb which expresses command, entreaty, advice, or exhortation, from Late Latin imperativus "pertaining to a command," from imperat-, past participle stem of imperare "to command, requisition," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + parare "to arrange, prepare, adorn" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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gal (n.)
slang pronunciation of girl, 1795, originally noted as a vulgarism (in Benjamin Dearborn's "Columbian Grammar"). Compare gell, 19c. literary form of the Northern England dialectal variant of girl, also g'hal, the girlfriend of a b'hoy (1849). Gal Friday is 1940, in reference to "Robinson Crusoe."
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