Etymology
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centralization (n.)

"act of bringing to one center," 1801, especially in politics, "concentration of administrative power in the central government at the expense of local self-government," originally with reference to Napoleonic France and on model of French centralisation. See centralize + -ation.

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hetaerocracy (n.)

"rule of courtesans," 1859, from hetaera + -cracy "rule or government by."

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Amtrak 

U.S. government-run railway corporation, 1971, contraction of American Track.

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hagiarchy (n.)

"government by persons in holy orders," 1826 (Southey, "Vindiciae Ecclesiae Anglicanae"); see hagio- "holy" + -archy "rule." Not to be confused with hagiocracy "government by persons considered holy" (1816), with -cracy.

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trollop 

1610s, "slovenly woman," often with implications of moral looseness, probably from troll (v.) in sense of "roll about, wallow."

[A] certain Anne Hayward, wife of Gregory Hayward of Beighton, did in the parishe church of Beighton aforesaid in the time of Divine Service or Sermon there, and when the Minister was reading & praying, violently & boisterously presse & enter into the seat or place where one Elizabeth, wife of Robert Spurlinir, was quietly at her Devotion & Duty to Almighty God and then and there did quarrel chide & braule & being evilly & malitiously bent did use then and there many rayleing opprobrious Speeches & Invectives against the said Elizabeth calling her Tripe & Trallop, to the great disturbance both of the Minister and Congregation. [Archdeaconry of Sudbury, Suffolk, Court Proceedings, 1682]
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polity (n.)

1530s, "civil organization;" 1640s, "an organized human society or community, body of persons forming a community governed according to a recognized system of government," from French politie (early 15c.) or directly from Late Latin polita "organized government" (see policy (n.1)).

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antarchy (n.)

"opposition to government," 1650s, from anti- "against, opposed to" + -archy "rule." Related: Antarchic.

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paternalism (n.)

1851, "feeling of a father for his children," from paternal + -ism. By 1866 "government as by a father over his children, undue solicitude on the part of the central government for the protection of the people," specifically "excessive governmental regulation of the private affairs and business methods of the people." Related: Paternalistic (1890).

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civics (n.)

"the science of government, study of the rights and responsibilities of a citizen," 1885, in American Institute of Civics, incorporated May 1885, from civic, by analogy with politics (see -ics).

"The term 'Civics,' however unfamiliar the word, could be wisely applied with a broader significance than that attached to 'Political Science,' as including not only the science of government, but political economy, and that part of social science which is related to government and citizenship." [E.E. White, quoted in The School Journal, July 25, 1885]
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Nehru 

in reference to a type of long, narrow jacket with a standing collar (popular in Western fashion late 1960s), 1967, from Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964), first prime minister of independent India (1947-1964), who often wore such a jacket in public appearances.

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