Etymology
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happy-go-lucky (adv.)
also happy go lucky, 1670s, "haphazard, in any way one pleases; every man for himself." Earlier as happy-be-lucky (1630s). The adjective, of persons, recorded from 1835, "careless," hence "carefree."
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frying-pan (n.)

"metal pan with a handle, used for frying," mid-14c., from verbal noun from fry (v.) + pan (n.). To go out of the frying-pan into the fire ("from a bad situation to a worse one") is attested in Thomas More (1532).

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baddish (adj.)
"rather bad," 1755, from bad (adj.) + -ish.
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baddy (n.)
"bad man, criminal, disreputable person," 1937, from bad (adj.) + -y (3).
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malodorous (adj.)

"having a bad or offensive odor," 1832, from mal- "bad" + odorous. Related: Malodorously; malodorousness.

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misgovernance (n.)

"misbehavior, misconduct," also "misrule, bad government of a country or state," late 14c., misgovernaunce, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + governance.

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misconduct (n.)

1710, "bad management, neglect;" see mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + conduct (n.). Meaning "wrong conduct" is attested from 1729.

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fetor (n.)
"offensive smell," mid-15c., from Latin fetor, foetor "stink, stench, bad smell," from fetere "have a bad smell" (see fetid).
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cachexia (n.)
"bad general state of health," 1550s (from 1540s in Englished form cachexy), from Latinized form of Greek kakhexia "bad habits," from kakos "bad" (from PIE root *kakka- "to defecate") + -exia, related to exis "habit or state," from exein "to have, be in a condition," from PIE root *segh- "to hold." Related: cachexic.
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caconym (n.)

"a name rejected for linguistic reasons, bad nomenclature in botany or biology," 1888, from caco- "bad, ill, poor" + -onym "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

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