Etymology
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bangle (n.)
"ornamental ring worn upon the arm or ankle," 1787, from Hindi bangri "colored glass bracelet or anklet."
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bell-jar (n.)
1830, so called for its shape, from bell (n.) + jar (n.). Earlier was bell-glass (1680s).
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tektite (n.)
small roundish glass bodies, probably of meteoric origin, 1909, from German tektit (Suess, 1900), from Greek tektos "molten," from tekein "to melt."
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obsidian (n.)

"dark, hard, glass-like volcanic rock," 1650s, from Latin obsidianus, misprint of Obsianus (lapis) "(stone) of Obsius," name of a Roman alleged by Pliny to have found this rock in Ethiopia.

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Collins (n.)

"iced gin drink served in a tall glass" (called a Collins glass), 1940, American English; earlier Tom Collins (by 1878), of uncertain origin. Popular in early 1940s; bartending purists at the time denied it could be based on anything but gin. The surname (12c.) is from a masc. proper name, a diminutive of Col, itself a pet form of Nicholas (compare Colin).

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insulator (n.)
1801, agent noun in Latin form from insulate (v.). In reference to the glass or earthenware devices to hold telegraph (later telephone) wires, from 1840s.
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cloche (n.)
type of bell-jar, 1882, from French cloche "bell, bell glass" (12c.), from Late Latin clocca "bell" (see clock (n.1)). As a type of women's hat, recorded from 1907, so called from its shape.
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baccarat (n.)
card game, 1848, from French baccara (19c.), which is of unknown origin. Baccarat is the name of a town in France that was noted for glass-making.
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Pyrex (n.)

1915, proprietary name (Corning Glass Works, Corning, N.Y.) of a type of hard, heat-resistant glass, an arbitrary coinage, in which advertisement writers and eager etymologists see implications of Greek pyr "fire" and perhaps Latin rex "king;" but the prosaic inventors say it was based on pie (n.1), because pie dishes were among the first products made from it. The -r-, in that case, is purely euphonious.

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braze (v.2)
"to make of or cover in brass," Old English brasian "to do work in brass, make of brass," from bræs (see brass (n.)). Compare glaze from glass.
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