Etymology
Advertisement
refill (n.)

"an act of filling again; that which serves to refill anything," 1884, from refill (v.). Meaning "a second drink" is from 1929; by 1960 as "the renewed contents of a glass."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bangle (n.)

"ornamental ring worn upon the arm or ankle," 1787, from Hindi bangri "colored glass bracelet or anklet."

Related entries & more 
tumbler (n.)

mid-14c., "acrobat," agent noun from tumble (v.). Compare Old English tumbere "tumbler, dancer." A fem. form was tumblester (early 15c.), tumbester (late 14c.) "female acrobatic dancer." Meaning "drinking glass" is recorded from 1660s, originally a glass with a rounded or pointed bottom which would cause it to "tumble;" thus it could not be set down until it was empty. As a part of a lock mechanism, from 1670s.

Related entries & more 
glassy (adj.)

late 14c., from glass (n.) + -y (2). From early 15c. in reference to the eye, etc., "fixed and expressionless."

Related entries & more 
pinata (n.)

"decorated container (originally a pot) filled with sweets and small gifts, suspended from a ceiling and broken by a blindfolded person on festive occasions," 1887, from Mexican Spanish piñata, in Spanish "jug, pot," ultimately from Latin pinea "pine cone," from pinus (see pine (n.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Collins (n.)

"iced gin drink served in a tall glass" (called a Collins glass), 1940, American English; earlier Tom Collins (by 1878), of uncertain origin. Popular in early 1940s; bartending purists at the time denied it could be based on anything but gin. The surname (12c.) is from a masc. proper name, a diminutive of Col, itself a pet form of Nicholas (compare Colin).

Related entries & more 
obsidian (n.)

"dark, hard, glass-like volcanic rock," 1650s, from Latin obsidianus, misprint of Obsianus (lapis) "(stone) of Obsius," name of a Roman alleged by Pliny to have found this rock in Ethiopia.

Related entries & more 
punching (n.)

c. 1400, "the cutting out of figures;" early 15c. as "the action of delivering blows with the fist," verbal noun from punch (v.). Related: Punching-bag "bag, generally large and heavy, suspended from the ceiling to be punched by an athlete, especially a boxer, for training or exercise" is by 1889 (also punch-bag); the figurative sense is attested by 1903.

Related entries & more 
tektite (n.)

small roundish glass bodies, probably of meteoric origin, 1909, from German tektit (Suess, 1900), from Greek tektos "molten," from tekein "to melt."

Related entries & more 
insulator (n.)

1801, agent noun in Latin form from insulate (v.). In reference to the glass or earthenware devices to hold telegraph (later telephone) wires, from 1840s.

Related entries & more 

Page 4